This Week in New York Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture in New York City Since 2001

MAKE MUSIC NEW YORK SUMMER 2018

make music new york

Make Music New York is back for its thirteenth summer season, celebrating the longest day of the year with more than a thousand free concerts across the city on June 21. There are Mass Appeal participatory events, live music in parks and plazas, unique gatherings in unusual places, and just about anything else you can think of. Below are only a handful of the highlights, arranged chronologically.

Sunrise/Sunset, communal performance by composer Brian Petuch, 155 Cedar St., World Trade Center, 5:25 am - 8:31 pm

Mass Appeal Vocals: Midsummer Mozart’s Requiem, 180 Greenwich St., 9/11 Memorial Plaza, 12 noon

Mamma Mia Sing Along Truck, Times Square at 12:30, Theodore Roosevelt Park at 2:00, Old Fulton Street Plaza at 4:00, and Storm Ritter Studio at 6:00

Joe’s Pub Block Party, with Treya Lam, Migguel Anggelo, Yemen Blues Duo featuring Ravid Kahalani & Omer Avital, Mohsen Namjoo, and M.A.K.U. Soundsystem, Astor Place Plaza, 1:00 - 7:00

On the Waterfront at Pier I, classical minimalist piano pieces performed by Ethan Liang and Ella Kronman, Emily Tong and Maxim Dybal Denysenko, Joan Forsyth and Griffin Strout, Olivia D’Amato and Griffin Strout, Katherine Miller, Mary Coit, Julia Meltzer, Mia and Michelle Akulfi, Curtis Decker, Ella Kronman and Jacqueline Ramirez, Ariela Bohrod, Yusei Hata, and Jenny Undercofler, Riverside Park off West Seventieth St., 4:30

Mass Appeal Bucket Drumming, with Jessie Nelson and Shelby Blezinger-McCay, Pearl St. Triangle, 5:00

The Well-Tempered Clavier, 9/11 Memorial Plaza, 5:00 - 8:00

LIC Block Party, with Avi B Three, the Blue Dahlia, and Underground Horns, Dutch Kills St., 5:00 - 9:00

Mass Appeal Harmonicas, with Jia-Yi He, Central Park Pond Lawn, 5:30

Mass Appeal Ukuleles, with Makalina Abalos Gallagher, Central Park Ladies Pavilion, 5:30

Harlem to Broadway!, Richard Amphitheater, Marcus Garvey Park, 6:00

Mass Appeal French Horns, with Linda Blacken and the French Horn Nation, “Uptown Grand Central” community plaza, East 125th St. & Park Ave., 6:30

The Mp3 Experiment Number Fifteen, Brooklyn Bridge Park’s Harbor View Lawn, Pier 1, 7:00

Mass Appeal Guitars, with Evie Dolan, Brandon Niederauer, and Maxwell Violet, Union Square Park, 7:00

Twilight Chorus (for Humans), composed by Pete M. Wyer, Brooklyn Botanical Garden, enter at 150 Eastern Pkwy., 7:00

Swamped, with Elliott Sharp and ten canoes, the Gowanus Dredgers Boathouse, 125-153 Second St., Brooklyn, 7:30

Mass Appeal Mandolins, with the New York Mandolin Orchestra, Theodore Roosevelt Park, 6:30

Muscota Marsh Harmony, with singers Kristen Kasarjian, George Kasarjian, Jeff Gavett, and Nina Dante and speaker operators John Hastings, Caroline Hastings, Terrance Solomone, and Kim Blair, Muscota Marsh, Inwood Park, 7:45

Make Music New York After Party, with Supermoon and Nation Beat, DROM, 85 Ave. A, 9:00

BRIC CELEBRATE BROOKLYN! FESTIVAL: AIMEE MANN / SUPERCHUNK / JONATHAN COULTON

Aimee Mann will be at Prospect Park Bandshell for free show with Superchunk and Jonathan Coulton on June 21 (photo by Sheryl Nields)

Aimee Mann will be at Prospect Park Bandshell for free show with Superchunk and Jonathan Coulton on June 21 (photo by Sheryl Nields)

Prospect Park Bandshell
Prospect Park
Ninth St. & Prospect Park West
Thursday, June 21, free, 7:00
www.bricartsmedia.org

On June 21, the free BRIC Celebrate Brooklyn! Festival is hosting one of its best summer lineups at the Prospect Park Bandshell, with Aimee Mann, Superchunk, and Jonathan Coulton. For four decades, Mann has proved herself to be one of the most brilliant singer-songwriters in the business, a perceptive and immensely clever wordsmith who digs deep into the heart in intimate songs about loss, love, and hope. (She’ll break your heart over and over again in this video for “Goose Snow Cone.”) But various bad dealings with record companies have kept her from becoming the superstar she should be, although she gets plenty of critical and popular acclaim. Originally with the Boston band ’Til Tuesday in the 1980s, Mann broke out on her own in the 1990s, releasing such fab albums as Whatever in 1993 and I’m with Stupid two years later. Her most recent disc, last year’s Mental Illness, earned her a Grammy for Best Folk Album; several of the songs are based on people she knows who are suffering from various forms of mental illness. Mann collaborated on three Mental Illness songs, “Patient Zero,” “Good for Me,” and “Rollercoasters,” with Brooklyn-based SuperEgo labelmate and graphic novelist Coulton, a friend whom she describes as “an internet-famous, nerd-centric songwriter, but he’s really great.” Coulton’s latest album, 2017’s Solid State, features such wide-ranging tunes as the Beatles-esque “Square Things,” the ballad “Pictures of Cats,” and the poppy “Don’t Feed the Trolls,” referring to social media.

Chapel Hill indie legends Superchunk, who will be celebrating their thirtieth anniversary next year (including a nine-year sabbatical), are coheadlining with Mann, touring behind their new disc, What a Time to Be Alive, a punk take on the world today, with such songs as “Erasure,” “Cloud of Hate,” and “Reagan Youth.” “It would be strange to be in a band, at least our band, and make a record that completely ignored the surrounding circumstances that we live in and that our kids are going to grow up in,” singer, guitarist, and cofounder Mac McCaughan says, explaining that the album’s “about a pretty dire and depressing situation but hopefully not a record that is dire and depressing to listen to.” In many ways, Mann could say the exact same thing about Mental Illness.

NYC PRIDE 2018

Pride Island packs them in on the pier every year as part of Pride Month

Pride Island packs them in on the pier every year as part of Pride Month

Multiple locations
June 18-24, free - $300 and more
www.nycpride.org

This year’s pride festivities honor the fiftieth anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which set the Gay Pride movement in motion in full force. There are some new parties, while the March itself has changed its route, so pay close attention to the locations listed below. As always, the ticketed events and VIP treatment are selling out fast, so you better act quickly if you want to shake it up at some pretty crazy gatherings.

Monday, June 18
OutCinema, screening of Ideal Home (Andrew Fleming, 2018), followed by a Q&A and open-bar after-party, SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd St., $35, 7:30

LGBT Community Center Garden Party: A Taste of Pride, with seasonal bites from North Square, Underwest Donuts, Boqueria, the Standard Grill, Rice & Gold, Quality Eats, Ample Hills Creamery, Ice & Vice, Javelina TexMex, Dinosaur BBQ, Sweet Chili, Café Patoro, Eataly, Breads Bakery, Enlightened Ice Cream, the Wayfarer, Island Oyster, and Hill Country Barbecue Market, Hudson River Park, Pier 84, West Side Highway at Forty-Fourth St., $99-$300, 6:00 - 10:00

Tuesday, June 19
OutCinema, screening of Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex Fashion & Disco (James Crump, 2017), followed by a Q&A and open-bar reception, SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd St., $25, 7:30

Family Movie Night: screening of Beauty and the Beast (Gary Trousdale & Kirk Wise, 1991), preceded by family-friendly games and activities, hosted by Miss Richfield 1981, Pier 45, Christopher St. Pier, Hudson River Park at Christopher St., free (reserved seating and other amenities $50), film at 8:30

Participants make their voices heard at the Rally and other Gay Pride events

Participants make their voices heard at the Rally and other Gay Pride events

Tuesday, June 19
through
Saturday, June 23

Pride Week at the Joyce, with a mixed program by MADBOOTS DANCE and The Missing Generation by Sean Dorsey Dance, Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Ave. at Nineteenth St., $10-$46

Wednesday, June 20
OutCinema, screening of From Selma to Stonewall: Are We There Yet? (Marilyn Bennett, 2016), followed by a special panel conversation moderated by Tiq Milan, SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd St., $25, 8:00

Thursday, June 21
Savor Pride, immersive food-driven fundraiser, with barbecue dishes by Amanda Freitag, Michael Anthony, Zac Young, Lazarus Lynch, and Jake Cohen, God’s Love We Deliver, 166 Sixth Ave. at Spring St., $80-$100, 6:00

Friday, June 22
The Rally, with performances by the Resistance Revival Chorus, Taina Asili, Ms. White, and others and speakers Dr. Herukhuti, Jodie Patterson, and more, hosted by Danity Diamond, Stonewall National Monument, Sheridan Square, free, 5:00 - 7:00

CosPlay & Pride, sunset cruise with Phi Phi O’Hara & DJ Cameron Cole, Pier 40, Hudson River Park, West Houston & Clarkson Sts., $35-$50, 6:00

Fantasy, with DJ Eddie Elias, DJ Jared Conner, and special secret performances, Slate, 54 West Twenty-First St., $60-$230, 10:00 pm - 4:00 am

The March brings people together -- and will do so on a new route in 2018

The March brings people together — and will do so on a new route in 2018

Saturday, June 23
Youth Pride, for LGBTQIA+ and ally teens, with DJs Amira & Kayla and a live performance by Bea Miller, 14th Street Park, Fourteenth St. between Tenth Ave. & West Side Highway, free, noon - 6:00 pm

VIP Rooftop Party, with DJs Boris, Dani Toro, J Warren and secret acts all day long, Hudson Terrace, 621 West 46th St., $75-$120, 2:00 - 10:00 pm

Teaze HER, with lap dance classes, a silent disco DJ battle, aphrodisiac oyster-tainment tastes, a spanking booth, electrified viola, curated tastings, specialty drink sipping, intimate burlesque, sexpert educational tips, and more, the DL, 95 Delancey St., $40-$80, 5:00 – midnight

Masterbeat Masterbuilt, construction-site party with casino, game show, university, and more, Hammerstein Ballroom, 311 West 34th St., $120-$140, 10:00 pm – 6:00 am

PrideFest street fair immediately follows the March

PrideFest street fair moves to University Pl. this year

Saturday, June 23
and
Sunday, June 24

Pride Island, with Tove Lo, Lizzo, DJ Simon Dunmore, Big Freedia, Sasha Velour, and DJ Dawson on Saturday, Kylie Minogue, DJ Grind, DJ Ralphi Rosario, and DJ Corey Craig on Sunday, Pier 97, Hudson River Park at Fifty-Seventh St. & West Side Highway, $60-$95

Sunday, June 24
PrideFest, twenty-fifth annual street fair with music, food, merchandise, and more, featuring live performances by Alex Newell, Parson James, and others, hosted by Ross Mathews, University Pl. between Thirteenth St. & Waverly Pl., free, 11:00 am – 6:00 pm

The March, with grand marshals Billie Jean King, Lambda Legal, Tyler Ford, and Kenita Placide, Lavender Line from 16th St. & Seventh Ave. to Eight St. & Fifth Ave. to Twenty-Ninth St. & Fifth Ave., free, 12 noon

Femme Fatale, women’s rooftop party with DJs RosyQ, Mary Mac, and Tatiana, hosted by Madison Paige, Hudson Terrace, 621 West 46th St., $30-$60, 4:00 - 10:00 pm

FREE SUMMER EVENTS: JUNE 17-24

The Breakfast Club screens for free in Bryant Park on Monday night

The Breakfast Club screens for free in Bryant Park on Monday night

The free summer arts & culture season is under way, with dance, theater, music, art, film, and other special outdoor programs all across the city. Every week we will be recommending a handful of events. Keep watching twi-ny for more detailed highlights as well.

Sunday, June 17
New York Philharmonic Concerts in the Parks: Free Indoor Concert in Staten Island, Music Hall, Snug Harbor Cultural Center & Botanical Garden, free, 3:00

Monday, June 18
Movie Nights in Bryant Park: The Breakfast Club (John Hughes, 1985), Bryant Park, lawn opens at 5:00, film begins at sunset

Tuesday, June 19
Night at the Museums, with free admission to and special programs at African Burial Ground National Monument, China Institute, Federal Hall National Memorial, Fraunces Tavern Museum, Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, National Archives at New York City, National Museum of the American Indian — Smithsonian Institution, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, 9/11 Tribute Museum, NYC Municipal Archives, Poets House, the Skyscraper Museum, and South Street Seaport Museum, 4:00 - 8:00

Big Daddy Kane celebrates thirty years since his debut record in Coney Island on June 20

Big Daddy Kane celebrates thirty years since his debut record in Coney Island on June 20

Wednesday, June 20
City Parks Foundation SummerStage: Big Daddy Kane: Long Live the Kane 30th Anniversary, with Big Daddy Kane and the Finisher Mister Cee, hosted by Doug E Fresh, Ford Amphitheater at Coney Island, 3052 West Twenty-First St., 7:00

Thursday, June 21
Smith Street Stage: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, directed by Jonathan Hopkins, continues Wednesday - Sunday through July 1, Carroll Park, Brooklyn

Friday, June 22
Films on the Green: La Bûche (Danièle Thompson, 1999), Transmitter Park, West St. between Kent St. and Greenpoint Ave., 8:30

Saturday, June 23
and
Sunday, June 24

Figment Festival, participatory arts activities, Governors Island, free, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

RUBIN MUSEUM BLOCK PARTY: WE MAKE THE FUTURE

Participants can build a future city at Rubin Museum block party

Participants can build a future city at Rubin Museum block party

Rubin Museum of Art
West 17th St. between Sixth & Seventh Aves.
Sunday, June 17, free (including free museum admission all day), 1:00 - 4:00
rubinmuseum.org

We always look forward to the annual Rubin Museum block party, and this year the Rubin is looking forward as well, into the future. The festivities take place on Father’s Day, June 17, from 1:00 to 4:00, with the theme “We Make the Future,” inspired by the Rubin’s yearlong exploration of what lies ahead: “By examining various perspectives — from an eighth-century Buddhist master to Einstein to contemporary artists — we invite you to consider a future that isn’t fixed but fluid,” the institution explains. The party will feature live performances by Falu’s Bazaar and Ajna Dance, a Cham dance and sand mandala by Palyul Monks, and a circle dance by elders from India Home. Visitors can participate in such activities as the “Healing Garden” indoor plant trailer, “Build a Future City,” “Social Timeline,” and “Drone Demo.” Among the organizations with booths are Adhikaar Grassroots Movement in Nepal, India Home, and Yinda Yin Coaching, with food available from Café Serai Outpost, Van Leeuwen Ice Cream Truck, Brooklyn Popcorn Truck, and Wafels & Dinges. In addition, the museum is open for free all day long, so you can check out “Masterworks of Himalayan Art,” the three-part “A Lost Future: Shezad Dawood/the Otolith Group/Matti Braun,” “A Monument for the Anxious and Hopeful,” “The Second Buddha,” “Chitra Ganesh,” “Sacred Spaces: The Road to . . . and the Tibetan Buddhist Shrine Room,” and “Gateway to Himalayan Art.”

RIVER TO RIVER FESTIVAL 2018

(photo by Victoria Sendra)

Catherine Galasso’s Of Granite and Glass at Winter Garden is part of LMCC River to River Festival (photo by Victoria Sendra)

Multiple downtown locations
June 15-24, free (some events require advance RSVP)
lmcc.net

The seventeenth annual River to River Festival gets under way today, kicking off ten days of free multidisciplinary programs in downtown Manhattan, sponsored by the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. R2R specializes in presenting hard-to-categorize works in unusual locations, and this year is no different. “The River to River Festival transforms the landscape of Lower Manhattan and works with artists and communities to explore lesser known pasts, presents, and futures of our neighborhoods,” curator Danielle King said in a statement. Among the highlights are silent :: partner, a dance piece about memory and exclusion by enrico d. wey in Federal Hall; MasterVoices’ Naamah’s Ark, an oratorio in Rockefeller Park about Noah’s Ark, preceded by a family-friendly art workshop; Cori Olinghouse’s Grandma, about which Olinghouse says, “While looping through the practice of hoarding, discarding, coveting, and display, I excavate a particular formation of white southern middle classness that is built up in my memories”; and the LES Citizens Parade, consisting of a processional and performances by senior citizens in Seward Park. Below is the full schedule.

Friday, June 15
through
Sunday, June 17

Catherine Galasso: Of Granite and Glass, part of Of Iron and Diamonds, based on Boccaccio’s Decameron, with performers Doug LeCours, Jordan D. Lloyd, Ambika Raina, and Mei Yamanaka and music by Dave Cerf, Winter Garden, Brookfield Place, 230 Vesey St. 6/15-16 at 7:00, 6/17 at 6:00

enrico d. wey: silent :: partner, Federal Hall, advance RSVP required, 8:00

Friday, June 15
through
Sunday, June 24

Elia Alba: The Supper Club, art installation, NYC DOT Art Display Cases on Water St. between Wall St. & Maiden Ln. and Gouverneur Ln. between Water & Front Sts.

Friday, June 16
and
Saturday, June 17

Cori Olinghouse: Grandma, performance installation created and directed by Cori Olinghouse, performed by Martita Abril and Cori Olinghouse, with visual design by Dean Moss and Cori Olinghouse, LMCC Studios at 125 Maiden Ln., 6/16 at 1:00 & 5:00, 6/17 at 1:00

Sunday, June 17
MasterVoices: Naamah’s Ark, oratorio composed by Marisa Michelson, with libretto by Royce Vavrek, performed by MasterVoices with Victoria Clark as Naamah and Sachal Vasandani as Merman, conducted by Ted Sperling, Rockefeller Park, 7:00 (preceded by art workshop 1:00 - 5:00)

(photo by Chloé Mossessian for FIAF)

It’s Showtime NYC! will make a statement on the steps of Federal Hall for R2R Festival (photo by Chloé Mossessian for FIAF)

Monday, June 18
through
Friday, June 22

It’s Showtime NYC!, site-responsive intervention by street dance company, directed by choreographer Marguerite Hemmings, steps of Federal Hall at Broad & Wall Sts. across from New York Stock Exchange, 4:00

Tuesday, June 19
Night at the Museums, free entry to African Burial Ground National Monument, China Institute, Federal Hall National Memorial, Fraunces Tavern Museum, Museum of Jewish Heritage — A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, National Archives at New York City, National Museum of the American Indian — Smithsonian Institution, National September 11 Memorial & Museum, 9/11 Tribute Museum, NYC Municipal Archives, Poets House, the Skyscraper Museum, South Street Seaport Museum, and more, 4:00 - 8:00

Thursday, June 21
Tribeca Art + Culture Night, with fine art galleries, art nonprofits, artists studios & residencies, university galleries, design galleries, museums, creative & crafts spaces, and public parks open late, some with special performances and talks, 6:00 - 9:00

Performance parade will feature senior citizens along the waterfront (photo courtesy of Laura Nova)

Performance parade will feature senior citizens along the waterfront (photo courtesy of Laura Nova)

Friday, June 22, 5:30
and
Sunday, June 24, 4:00

Naomi Goldberg Haas & Laura Nova: LES Citizens Parade, activist processional and performances by senior citizens cocreated by choreographer and Dances for a Variable Population artistic director Naomi Goldberg Haas and visual artist Laura Nova, Seward Park

Saturday, June 23
Engaging LES: Daytime Movement Workshops, movement-based activities including cardio, dance & sweat, Latin, jazz, hip-hop, lindy hop, jazz funk at 10:30 am, Tai Chi workshop at noon, boxing/self-defense at 1:30, and Movement for Life workshop at 3:00, East River Esplanade at Rutgers Slip under the FDR Dr.

NICK CAVE: THE LET GO / WEATHER OR NOT / THESE BAGS WE CARRY ARE FILLED WITH PROMISE

(photo by James Ewing)

Jorell Williams holds his hands up near the beginning of Nick Cave’s Up Right presentation at the Park Avenue Armory (photo by James Ewing)

Park Avenue Armory and other locations
Wade Thompson Drill Hall
643 Park Ave. between 66th & 67th Sts.
Through July 1, $17-$45
www.armoryonpark.org
nickcaveart.com

Multidisciplinary artist and fashion educator Nick Cave offers relief and release from these hard times with Up Right, a ritual-laden immersive performance that slowly builds to an explosive dance party in the massive Wade Thompson Drill Hall in the Park Avenue Armory, part of his major installation The Let Go. As visitors enter the hall, they encounter the hundred-foot-long, forty-foot-high “chase,” two enormous curtains made of many-colored Mylar strips, representing social justice, that glitter in the light as they glide across the space. You can walk through them, but don’t sit on any of the small stools among them, which are for the performers. Ticket holders sit on the periphery on the floor, on benches, or in folding chairs as the curtains stop moving and Darrell Nickens begins playing the piano. Members of Vy Higginsen’s Sing Harlem Choir, consisting primarily of teen girls of color, enter the room, followed by a dozen men with their hands up, in the now-all-too-familiar “Don’t shoot” pose. Jorell Williams starts singing the gospel classic “Wonderful Change” while he and the other men sit in the stools and are dressed by men and women in white lab coats, putting them in Cave’s shaman-like soundsuits, made of colorful accessories that completely cover the body, hiding their gender, age, race, ethnicity, etc. The Sing Harlem Choir then performs a gospel version of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” from Carousel, as the men in the soundsuits march and dance around the room to choreography by Francesca Harper and Cave and approach some audience members, taking their hands and making connections. It’s all rather tame, obvious, overly simplistic, and repetitive, like the United Colors of Benetton telling us that we can indeed all get along. But after the ninety-minute show, the hall turns into a dance party where some of the performers return and move and groove to the hot beats with anyone who wants to now cut loose as “chase” winds around the space again.

(photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Nick Cave’s soundsuits are activated as part of The Let Go (photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Taking place Wednesdays through Fridays through July 1, Up Right ($35, 8:00) is only one of a number of Let Go programs that are part of the installation, which is curated by Tom Eccles. On Saturdays and Sundays, the general installation is open to the public ($17, 11:00 am to 6:00 pm), with DJs getting things rocking at 2:00, including Joe Claussell on June 16, JD Samson on June 17, Noise Cans on June 23, Sabine Blaizin on June 24, Sammy Jo on June 30, and Tedd Patterson on July 1, with games of Twister, Soul Train lines, soundsuit invasions, a special line dance that you can rehearse here, and more. Numerous sections of the soundsuits are on display in various period rooms, bursting with color and mystery. On June 14 ($25, 7:00), the Freedom Ball should be a splashy evening of fashion, music, and dance, hosted by Matthew Placek and featuring Marshall Jefferson, Ladyfag, Papi Juice, Saada of Everyday People, and others. There will be a Dress to Express ball-style costume contest at 11:00 with $20,000 in prize money spread around three categories, State of the World, Unlike Anything Else, and Dare-Flair; among the judges are artist Mickalene Thomas, art collector and consultant Racquel Chevremon, and Cave. And on June 26 ($45, 7:30), “An Evening of Artistic Responses: The Let Go” brings together songwriter and musician Nona Hendryx, vocalist and artist Helga Davis, dancer and choreographer Harper, and FLEXN dance pioneer Reggie (Regg Roc) Gray and the D.R.E.A.M. Ring for site-specific performative responses curated by Cave, who in 2013 transformed Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall into a wildly inventive petting zoo for “Heard•NY.”

(photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Nick Cave’s Tondos deliver a critical message in “Weather or Not” at Jack Shainman Gallery in Chelsea (photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Cave fans will also want to check out “These bags we carry are filled with promise,” the new kaleidoscopic three-dimensional mural he and his design collaborator, Bob Faust, have installed in the lobby of New York Live Arts; the opening reception is June 15 from 4:30 to 6:30. On view through September, the soundsuit mural is made from woven bags and is meant to represent the hopes, dreams, and aspirations we all carry inside us but don’t always let out. And through June 23, Cave’s “Weather or Not” exhibition at Jack Shainman in Chelsea is a gorgeous collection of eye-catching wire Tondos that swirl with life on the walls; the mesmerizing, bold colors are based on weather patterns, but they’re superimposed on barely visible scans of the brains of black youths suffering from PTSD because of gun violence. As always, Cave offers beauty and originality tinged with both hope and fear.