This Week in New York Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture in New York City Since 2001

BURGERS, BOURBON & BEETHOVEN FESTIVAL

Burgers Bourbon Beethoven

The inaugural Burgers, Bourbon & Beethoven Festival takes place in Green-Wood Cemetery on May 25

Green-Wood Cemetery
Fifth Ave. and 25th St., Brooklyn
Saturday, May 25, $80 (twenty-one and older only), 7:00
www.green-wood.com

Historic Green-Wood Cemetery kicks off its second season of the Angel’s Share classical music concert series and summer with the inaugural Burgers, Bourbon & Beethoven Festival. On May 25 by the Gothic Arch, you can sample sliders from Harlem Public and Madcap Café and vote for the winner of the Golden Spatula, enjoy tastings from Angel’s Envy, Blackened American Whiskey, Five & 20, NY Distilling Co, Van Brunt Stillhouse, Widow Jane, and other distilleries, and listen to Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony performed by the String Orchestra of Brooklyn, conducted by Eli Spindel. The evening is presented by Death of Classical and the Green-Wood Historic Fund and will be hosted by Matt Abramovitz of WQXR. In addition, there will be a preconcert sunset reception with a view of New York harbor and the Manhattan skyline.

BJÖRK’S CORNUCOPIA

(photo by Santiago Felipe)

Björk’s Cornucopia is a stunning world premiere commission at the Shed (photo by Santiago Felipe)

The McCourt at the Shed
The Bloomberg Building
545 West 30th St. at Eleventh Ave.
May 22, 25, 28, and June 1
646-455-3494
theshed.org
www.bjork.com

In 2012, Icelandic musician, actress, and international fashion plate Björk presented Biophilia at Roseland, a multimedia performance based on her 2011 app album, an exploration of the relationship between nature, music, and technology. In 2015, her Vulnicura tour opened at Carnegie Hall, an emotional and personal examination of her breakup with longtime partner Matthew Barney. And now the Iceland- and Brooklyn-based artist has inaugurated her latest elaborate production, Björk’s Cornucopia, at the Shed’s McCourt concert venue, where the dazzling show, based primarily on her 2017 concept album about love and nature, Utopia, continues through June 1. Cornucopia begins with several a cappella songs performed by Iceland’s Hamrahlíð Choir in front of the stage, including Björk’s “Sonnets/Unrealities XI” and “Cosmogony,” the boys wearing dark slacks and white shirts buttoned to the top, the girls in traditional folk outfits; at one point the members of the choir — which Björk belonged to when she was a teenager and is still led by the same conductor, founder Þorgerður Ingólfsdóttir — darted up and down the aisles of the raised rows of seating.

(photo by Santiago Felipe)

Björk dazzles in ethereal multimedia production at the McCourt (photo by Santiago Felipe)

It’s then Björk’s turn, and she takes the multilevel stage in a nautilus-like costume designed by Olivier Rousteing of Balmain and Iris Van Herpen, with a headdress by co-creative director and frequent collaborator James Merry that covers much of her eyes. She emerges from behind a curtain of hanging ropes where Tobias Gremmler’s giant color-drenched videos of animated flora and cosmic fireworks (and an avatar of Björk) are projected; the video also appears on a large rear screen. Chiara Stephenson’s set features a pod that looks like an alien-head silo and a platform that extends four rows into the center of the audience. The music is played by Icelandic flute septet Viibra, dressed like fairies, along with harpist Katie Buckley, percussionist Manu Delago, and Bergur Þórisson on electronics; the complex lighting design is by Bruno Poet, with choreography by Margrét Bjarnadóttir. All the elements, under the direction of Argentine film director Lucretia Martel (The Headless Woman, Zama), come together to form a celestial wonderland where Björk’s ethereal music, less dance-oriented than on previous tours, transports the audience on an otherworldly adventure.

Nature comes to the forefront in (photo by Santiago Felipe)

Nature comes to the forefront in Björk’s Cornucopia (photo by Santiago Felipe)

Björk performs twelve of Utopia’s fourteen tracks, including “The Gate,” “Arisen My Senses,” “Claimstaker,” and “Blissing Me” (joined by experimental musician serpentwithfeet), as well as such older songs as “Show Me Forgiveness” and “Mouth’s Cradle” from Medúlla, “Hidden Place” and “Pagan Poetry” from Vespertine, and “Venus as a Boy” from Debut, each with its own unique sonic and visual flourishes. Delago swishes upside-down bamboo-like bowls in a tank of water. A metal ring drops from the ceiling, surrounding Björk as four members of Viibra play flutes embedded in the circle. Björk sings from inside the closed pod. There are different ways to experience the show; if your seats are near the front, it feels more intimate, especially with Björk singing such lyrics as “Just that kiss / Was all there is / Every cell in my body / Lined up for you / Legs a little open / Once again / Awaken my senses / Head topless / Arisen my senses” and “Utopia / It’s not elsewhere / It’s here” in close proximity. But from farther back, the epic scope of the videos and staging combine for a bolder, more immersive effect.

(photo by Santiago Felipe)

Björk is joined by Icelandic flute septet Viibra for Cornucopia (photo by Santiago Felipe)

Prior to the encores, a recording of sixteen-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg is projected, the schoolgirl explaining that “we are about to sacrifice our civilization for the opportunity of a very small number of people to continue making unimaginable amounts of money. The biosphere is being sacrificed so that rich people in countries like mine can live in luxury. . . . We cannot solve a crisis without treating it as a crisis . . . And if the solutions within this system are so impossible to find, then maybe we should change the system itself.” It’s a powerful statement that Björk follows with “Future Forever,” in which she opines (in a lush new costume), “Imagine a future and be in it / Feel this incredible nurture, soak it in / Your past is on a loop, turn it off / See this possible future and be in it.” It’s hard not to get on board with that direct yet hopeful sentiment.

FLEET WEEK 2019

Fleet Week will feature celebrations, commemorations, and memorials May 24-30 in all five boroughs (photo courtesy Fleet Week New York)

Fleet Week will feature celebrations, commemorations, and memorials May 22-28 in all five boroughs (photo courtesy Fleet Week New York)

Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum and other locations in all five boroughs
Pier 86, 12th Ave. & 46th St.
May 22–28
www.intrepidmuseum.org
militarynews.com

The U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard will be pouring into New York City for Fleet Week, which takes place May 22-28 at the Intrepid, in Times Square, and at other locations. The annual celebration, which began in 1982, leads into Memorial Day weekend, reminding everyone that the holiday is not just about barbecues and beaches. Below are only some of the highlights, all free and open to the public. Admission to the museum, which is hosting many indoor demonstrations, exhibitions, and performances, is $24-$33 but free for all U.S. military and veterans.

Wednesday, May 22
Parade of Ships, New York Harbor, Pier 86, 8:00 am

Musical Performance: U.S. Fleet Forces “Brass Band,” South Street Seaport, 12 Fulton St., 12:30

Musical Performance: Navy Band Northeast’s “Ceremonial Band,” Washington Square Park arch, 4:00

Thursday, May 23
USNA Yard Patrol Squadron, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

USCGC Lawrence Lawson, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Musical Performance: U.S. Fleet Forces “Brass Band,” Union Square Park, noon

Thursday, May 23
through
Saturday, May 25

Navy Dive Tank, Military Island, Times Square, 10:00 am - 5:00

Friday, May 24
USNA Yard Patrol Squadron, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

USCGC Lawrence Lawson, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

USCG Silent Drill Team, Military Island, Times Square, 2:30

USMC Martial Arts Program demonstration, Military Island, Times Square, 3:15

Summer Movie Night: Top Gun (Tony Scott, 1986), Intrepid Flight Deck, 7:00

Musical Performance: U.S. Fleet Forces “Brass Band,” Military Island, Times Square, 7:30

Saturday, May 25
U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force Auxiliary/Civil Air Patrol, LEGOLAND New York Resort, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Intrepid Education, American Red Cross, Restored and Antique Military Vehicle Clubs, Guide Dog Foundation/America’s Vet Dogs — The Veterans K-9 Corp, American Legion and FDNY, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

USCGC Lawrence Lawson, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Musical Performance: RamCorps, University of Mobile, Pier 86 main stage, noon

Facepainting: Faces by Derrick, Pier 86, noon - 4:00

Musical Performance: Latin Giants of Jazz, Pier 86 main stage, 1:00

USCG Silent Drill Team, Rockefeller Center Plaza, 2:00

Musical Performance: USMC Battle Color Detachment, including the USMC Silent Drill Platoon and Drum and Bugle Corps, Marine Day at Prospect Park, 3:30

Musical Performance — America's Sweethearts: Vintage Vocal Trio, Pier 86 main stage, 3:00 & 5:00

Musical Performance: 78th Army Band, Pier 86 main stage, 4:00

Musical Performance: Navy Band Northeast’s Rock Band “Rhode Island Sound,” Military Island, Times Square, 6:00

Musical Performance: USMC Battle Color Detachment, including the USMC Silent Drill Platoon and Drum and Bugle Corps, Father Duffy Square, Times Square, 8:00

Sunday, May 26
U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force Auxiliary/Civil Air Patrol, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary, Intrepid Education, American Red Cross, Restored and Antique Military Vehicle Clubs, Guide Dog Foundation/America’s Vet Dogs — The Veterans K-9 Corp, LEGOLAND New York Resort, American Legion, and FDNY, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

USCGC Lawrence Lawson, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Facepainting: Faces by Derrick, Pier 86, noon - 4:00

Musical Performance: RamCorps, University of Mobile, Pier 86 main stage, noon & 2:00

Musical Performance — America's Sweethearts: Vintage Vocal Trio, Pier 86 main stage, 1:00 & 3:00

Musical Performance: singer, songwriter and Marine Corps veteran Laura Rice, Pier 86 main stage, 4:00

Musical Performance: Navy Band Northeast’s Rock Band “Rhode Island Sound,” Military Island, Times Square, 5:00

Monday, May 27
U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force Auxiliary/Civil Air Patrol, Intrepid Education, LEGOLAND New York Resort, and FDNY, Pier 86, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Memorial Day Ceremony, Pier 86, 11:00 am

Facepainting: Faces by Derrick, Pier 86, noon - 4:00

USCGC Lawrence Lawson, visiting ship tour, Pier 86, noon - 6:00 pm

USCGC Silent Drill Team Performance, Pier 86, 2:00

Gazillion Bubble Show: Interactive Bubble Garden, Pier 86, 2:00 - 6:00

American Cornhole League: Games and Challenges, Pier 86, 2:00 - 6:00

USCGC Search and Rescue Demonstration, West End Pier 86, 3:00

REICH RICHTER PÄRT

(photo by twi-ny/mdr)

A flash mob sings Arvo Pärt’s “Drei Hirtenkinder aus Fátima” in room of Gerhard Richter wallpaper and tapestries (photo by twi-ny/mdr)

The Shed
Level 2 Gallery in the Bloomberg Building
545 West 30th St. at Eleventh Ave.
Tuesday - Sunday through June 2, four times daily, $25
646-455-3494
theshed.org

The Shed, the new performance space at Hudson Yards, has made a rather inauspicious debut. The experimental play Norma Jeane Baker of Troy, inaugurating the five-hundred-seat black-box Griffin Theater, is a critical and popular flop, with bad reviews, walkouts, and lots of empty seats. The first art installation, an untitled work by Trisha Donnelly, initially cost ten dollars but was made free after a less-than-enthusiastic reaction to the exhibit, which consists of trees on gurneys in a dark room where Leontyne Price’s rendition of “Habanera” from Carmen repeats over and over. But the immersive Reich Richter Pärt is a bit more on track, though it too has its drawbacks. “We’re only getting started,” artistic director Alex Poots told me after a recent performance; Poots previously did wonderful things at the Manchester Festival and Park Ave. Armory.

Curated by senior program advisor Hans Ulrich Obrist and Poots, Reich Richter Pärt is a two-room, fifty-minute multidisciplinary collaboration between eighty-two-year-old American composer Steve Reich, eighty-seven-year-old German visual artist Gerhard Richter, and eighty-three-year-old Estonian composer Arvo Pärt. The audience is first let into an expansive white space with high ceilings; the walls feature vertical wallpaper and jacquard woven tapestries that emulate Rorschach-like strips that are supposed to resemble stained glass, as if the room is a cathedral. Visitors are given too much time to walk around and look at the images; many break off into conversations and take out their cell phones until a group of men and women starts singing, a flash mob performing Pärt’s lovely choral work “Drei Hirtenkinder aus Fátima,” about three Portuguese shepherd children who claimed to see an apparition of the Virgin Mary in 1917. The choral work, which is dedicated to Richter and was inspired by Psalms 8.2 (“From the mouths of children and infants you create praise for yourself”), is performed by either the Choir of Trinity Wall Street Performing Ensemble or Brooklyn Youth Chorus.

(photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Gerhard Richter and Corinna Belz’s abstract film screens with live score by Steve Reich (photo by twi-ny/mdr)

The crowd is then led into a second large room, where people can grab folding chairs and sit wherever they like in the empty space between a wall on one side with a screen and a small orchestra on the other, either the Ensemble Signal or the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), depending on the date. (I saw the former, conducted by Brad Lubman. Poots suggested sitting very close to the musicians for the optimal experience, so I joined such visitors as Marina Abramovic and Francis Ford Coppola.) The orchestra plays Reich’s newly commissioned score, created specifically for an approximately half-hour film by Richter and Corinna Belz, which brings to life Richter’s algorithmic processing of his 2016 abstract painting Abstraktes Bild (946-3), using a computer to fold it in half and half again, dividing it into 1/4096ths and then proceeding in the other direction, creating a hypnotic, kaleidoscopic animation in which the painting morphs from bands of bold color, which also line two walls, into yet more Rorschach-like shapes and figures slowly marching across the screen until it all double back to the color strips. (The original work is on view as well.) The film follows the principles Richter employed in his “Patterns” series, which Reich adapted for his thrilling score. As with the first part of the presentation, the second goes on too long, but it’s still a wonder to behold, an example of the kind of fascinating promise the Shed holds.

THE WORLD’S FARE 2019

worlds fare

EAT. DRINK. UNITE.
Citi Field
123-01 Roosevelt Ave.
Saturday, May 18, and Sunday, May 19, noon - 7:00
General admission $23, with three-hour beer garden $49, VIP $199
theworldsfare.nyc
www.eventbrite.com

The second annual World’s Fare at Citi Field, near where the 1963-64 World’s Fair took place, features more than one hundred food vendors from all five boroughs, more than five dozen craft breweries, a World Market Bazaar, and more. The Culinary Committee co-chairs this year are Gael Greene, Alex Raij, Anita Lo, and Joshua Schneps, with the festival curated by food-arena movers and shakers Liza Mosquito deGuia, Niko Triantafillou, Jean Lee, Joe DiStefano, George Motz, Tia Keenan, Hannah Goldberg, Felipe Donnelly, Jenny Dorsey, Joseph Yoon, Karen Seiger, Kysha Harris, Tamy Rofe, and Cindy VandenBosch. There will be live music by Black Tie Brass Band, Strings N Skins, Funky Dawgz Brass Band, Mariachi Loco, Rho & the Nomads, Royal KhaoZ, Kaleta & Super Yamba, and Underground Horns and dance performances by Sachiyo Ito & Company, Leggz Ltd., American Bolero Dance Company, NY Chinese Cultural Center, Salit Bellydance, Nartan Rang Dance Academy, Country Dancing, KG Group Entertainment, Gemuetlichen Enzianer Dancers, and Schade Academy of Irish Dancing along with interactive murals, karate exhibitions, henna, African body painting, art by Taisan Tanaka, and other events. Among the participating eateries are Baba’s Pierogies, Balkan Bites, Barbecue on a Stick, Caribbean Street Eats, Chef Jimmy’s Vicious Creole Cycle, D’Abruzzo NYC, DiRiso Risotto Balls, Donovan’s Pub, Down East Lobstah, Duck Season, George Motz’s Oklahoma Fried Onion Cheeseburger, Keki Modern Cakes, Little Porky’s, Macaron Parlour, Melt Bakery, Memphis Seoul, Miss Holly’s Smokehouse, Nansense, Oaxaca Taqueria, Republic of Booza, Rooster Boy, Sam’s Fried Ice Cream, Stuffed Ice Cream, Tania’s Kitchen, Twisted Potato, Wafels & Dinges, and What’s the Dillaz. General admission is $23; you can add three hours of libations in the beer garden for another $26, while VIP access goes for $199.

Harlem EatUp!

Dine+In+Marcus,+JJ,+Alex+and+Michael

Chefs Marcus Samuelsson and JJ Johnson (left) return for the fifth annual Harlem EatUp! Festival (photo courtesy Harlem EatUp!)

Multiple locations in Harlem
May 13-19, free - $250
harlemeatup.com

The fifth annual Harlem EatUp! Festival takes place May 13-19, with dozens of chefs, restaurants, culinary organizations, mixmasters, and artists participating in tastings, dinners, concerts, and more celebrating Harlem culture, hosted by Bevy Smith. Below are only some of the special events happening uptown, with part of the proceeds benefiting Citymeals on Wheels, Historic Harlem Parks, and Harlem Park to Park.

Monday, May 13
Dine in Harlem: BLVD Bistro, hosted by owner Carlos Swepson and guest chef Leah Cohen, $135, 7:00

Tuesday, May 14
Dine in Harlem: FieldTrip, hosted by chef JJ Johnson and guest chef Marc Vetri, $85, 7:00

Wednesday, May 16
Dine in Harlem: Melba’s Restaurant, with owner Melba Wilson and guest chef Jerome Grant and DJ Nas Leber, $100, 7:00

Thursday, May 16
The Harlem EatUp! Annual Luminary Award Dinner, honoring Lana Turner and David N. Dinkins, hosted by chef Marcus Samuelsson and guest chefs Mashama Bailey of the Grey and Emma Bengtsson of Aquavit, Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka, Mac McDonald of Vision Cellars, and Andre Mack of Maison Noir, with live music by the Rakiem Walker Project, Red Rooster Harlem, $250, 6:30

Saturday, May 18
The EatUp! Main Stage at the Harlem Stroll, with culinary demonstrations and live performances, Morningside Park, free, 12:30 – 5:30

Ultimate Grand Tasting at the Harlem Stroll, featuring participants Alvin Lee Smalls of Lee Lee’s Bakery, Alyah Horsford-Sidberr of Cove Lounge, Angel Grande of Nocciola Ristorante, Antonio Settepani of Settepani, Ashley Dikos and Andrew Martinez of Bo’s Bagels, Carlos Salazar of Rincón Mexicano, Carlos Swepson of BLVD Bistro, Cédric Durand of Tastings Social presents GAUDir, Cédric Durand of Charles’ Country Pan Fried Chicken, Drunken Fruit, Giannina Gutierrez, Harlem Haberdashery, Camaron Fagan of Harlem Tavern, Humberto Guallpa of Row House, Jake Timmons of Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, Jamaica Tourism Board, Norma Jean Darden of Miss Mamie’s Spoonbread, Jelena Pasic of Harlem Shake, Jessica Spaulding of Harlem Chocolate Factory, Juliet and Justine Masters of the Edge Harlem, Lara Land, Lexis Gonzalez and Dr. Sharon Gonzalez of Lady Lexis Sweets, Leticia “Skai” Young and Raymond Zamanta Mohan of LoLo’s Seafood Shack, Marcus Samuelsson of Red Rooster Harlem/Ginny’s Supper Club, Matthew Trebek & Nodar Mosiashvili of OSO Harlem, Milton Washington, Melba Wilson of Melba’s Restaurant, Nick Larsen and Petrushka Bazin Larsen of Sugar Hill Creamery, Nocciola, RanDe Rogers of Sisters Caribbean Cuisine, Raymond Weber of CUT by Wolfgang Puck, and Zach Sharaga and Samantha Phillips of Dear Mama, adults only, Morningside Park, $85, 12:30 – 5:30

Saturday, May 18
and
Sunday, May 19

The Marketplace at the Harlem Stroll, with more than two dozen food vendors, a kids’ zone, demonstrations, live performances, and more, Morningside Park, free, 12:30 – 5:30

Sunday, May 19
The EatUp! Main Stage at the Harlem Stroll, with DJ Stormin’ Norman, David Burtka, JJ Johnson of FieldTrip/Henry by JJ, Marcus Samuelsson, Neil Patrick Harris, Scott Conant of Cellaio Steak, Karl Franz Williams of Solomon & Kuff Rum Hall, Charles Gabriel of Charles’ Country Pan Fried Chicken, Johnny Mambo & Friends, Vy Higginson’s Sing Harlem Choir, and more, Morningside Park, free, 12:30 – 5:30

Ultimate Grand Tasting at the Harlem Stroll, featuring participants Aliyyah Baylor of Make My Cake, Amie Kiros of Piatto d’Oro, Andrew LoPresto of Bar314, Antonio Settepani of Settepani, Aromas Boutique Bakery, Camaron Fagan of Harlem Tavern, Carlos Salazar of Rincón Mexicano, Carlos Swepson of BLVD Bistro, Chris Pollok of Bier International, Davie Simmons of Uptown Veg & Juice Bar, Dear Mama, Drunken Fruit, Greedy Pot, Harlem Haberdashery, Humberto Guallpa of Row House, Jamaica Tourism Board, Jessica Spaulding of Harlem Chocolate Factory, Julian Medina of La Chula Harlem, Kenichi Tajima of Tastings Social presents Mountain Bird, Lara Land, Leon Johnson, Lexis Gonzalez and Dr. Sharon Gonzalez of Lady Lexis Sweets, Lloyd’s Carrot Cake, Betty Campbell-Adams of Maison Harlem, Marcus Samuelsson of Red Rooster Harlem/Ginny’s Supper Club, Mark Rosati of Shake Shack, Neca Bryan of Kingston Restaurant & Bar, Norma Jean Darden of Miss Mamie’s Spoonbread, RanDe Rogers of Sisters Caribbean Cuisine, Yohey Horishita, and Zachary Gelnaw-Rubin of Lion Lion, adults only, Morningside Park, $85, 12:30 – 5:30

AI: ARE YOU BRAVE ENOUGH FOR THE BRAVE NEW WORLD?

live ideas

LIVE IDEAS 2019
New York Live Arts
219 West 19th St.
May 8-12, $10-$20
newyorklivearts.org

New York Live Arts’ seventh annual Live Ideas humanities festival explores artificial intelligence with five days of art, dance, discussion, music, lectures, and more, asking the question “AI: Are You Brave Enough for the Brave New World?” Inaugurated in 2013, the festival previously focused on Dr. Oliver Sacks and James Baldwin; social, political, artistic, and environmental issues; a nonbinary future; and strengthening democracy. Among those participating in the 2019 edition are Bill T. Jones, Nick Hallett, Yuka C Honda, Scorpion Mouse, Kyle McDonald, Patricia Marx, and Eunsu Kang, delving into technological dreaming, coding, mental illness, drones, and the truth. Tickets for most events are between ten and twenty dollars; below are some of the highlights.

Wednesday, May 8
What Is AI?, keynote/performance with Nick Hallett, Meredith Broussard, Patricia Marx, Baba Israel, and Ragamuffin, $15, 6:00

Wednesday, May 8
through
Saturday, May 11

Rhizomatiks Research X ELEVENPLAY X Kyle McDonald: discrete figures, performed on stage designed for interactivity between performers, drones, and AI, $36-$45, 8:00

Thursday, May 9
Future of Work, panel discussion with Arun Sunderarajan, Matthew Putman, Carrie Gleason, Madeleine Clare Elish, and moderator Ritse Erumi, $20, 6:00

Rational Numbers: Music and AI, performance by Yuka C Honda and Angélica Negrón, $10, 9:00

Friday, May 10
Does Truth Need Defending?, panel discussion with Ambika Samarthya-Howard, Hilke Schellmann, Jeff Smith, and moderator Malika Saada Saar, $10, 6:00

Algorave: LiveCode.NYC, rave featuring AI experiments and live performances by Scorpion Mouse, CIBO + Ulysses Popple, Colonel Panix + nom de nom, ioxi + Zach Krall, and Codie, $10, 9:00

(photo by Tomoya Takeshita )

Rhizomatiks Research, ELEVENPLAY, and Kyle McDonald collaborate on interactive performance piece discrete figures (photo by Tomoya Takeshita )

Saturday, May 11
Symposium: AI x ART, including “Body, Movement, Language: AI Sketches” with Bill T. Jones, “Between Science & Speculation: Technological Dreaming” with Ani Liu, “AI in Performance: Making discrete figures” with Kyle McDonald, “Yes, AI CAN help you develop a new relationship with your audience” with Dr. Brett Ashley Crawford, “Livecoding Traversals through Sonic Spaces” with Jason Levine, “GANymedes: Art with AI” with Eunsu Kang, “Emergent Storytelling with Artificial Intelligence” with Rachel Ginsberg, and “Creating in the Age of AI” with Ani Liu, Dr. Brett Ashley Crawford, Eunsu Kang, Kyle McDonald, and Bill T. Jones, $15, 4:30

Sunday, May 12
Class: How to Question Technology, Or, What Would Neil Postman Say?, with Lance Strate, $15, 1:30

HACK-ART-THON: ACT LABS, “Breaking the Stigma Around Mental Illness,” prototype presentation, jury deliberation, and award ceremony, with Katy Gero & Anastasia Veron, Artyom Astafurov & Beth Graczyk, Jennifer Ding & Dominika Jezewska, Ishaan Jhaveri & Esther Manon Siddiquie, Keely Garfield & Cynthia Hua, Keira Heu-Jwyn Chang & Nia Laureano, Jared Katzman & Rachel Kunstadt, and Marco Berlot & Zeelie Brown, free with advance RSVP, 6:30