This Week in New York Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture in New York City Since 2001

CHELSEA ART WALK SUMMER 2014

Churner and Churner will host live performances during opening reception for Ander Mikalson’s “Three’s Company for Eight Performers” during Chelsea Art Walk

Churner and Churner will host live performances during opening reception for Ander Mikalson’s “Three’s Company for Eight Performers” during Chelsea Art Walk

Multiple locations in Chelsea
Thursday, July 24, free, 5:00 - 8:00
www.artwalkchelsea.com

More than one hundred galleries from Sixteenth to Thirtieth Sts. between Ninth and Eleventh Aves. will keep their doors open until 8:00 tonight for the fifth annual Chelsea Art Walk. The evening includes open studios, artist talks, panel discussions, book signings, receptions, photo shoots, and other events. Below are some of our recommended highlights.

Agora Gallery
Wearable Art Photo Shoot: Everyone is invited to show up wearing some kind of self-made art (clothing, makeup, hair, nails), 530 West 25th St., 6:30 – 7:30

Bertrand Delacroix Gallery
Sneak peek at Federico Infante’s fall exhibition, “The Space Between,” including raffle of original Infante drawing, 535 West 25th St., 5:00 – 8:00

Churner and Churner
Performance and reception for opening of Ander Mikalson’s “Three’s Company for Eight Performers,” 205 Tenth Ave., three performances, 5:00 – 8:00

Dean Borghi — NBR Contemporary
Book reading, White Collar Slavery: Based on a Bit of Truth and a Few White Lies by Laurance Rassin and Tracy Memoil, 5:00; live music by Clusterfunk and short film Art Sharks, 6:00 - 8:00, 547 West 27th St.

Hauser & Wirth
Sterling Ruby “Sunrise Sunset” panel discussion with Michael Darling, Jeremy Strick, and Huma Bhabha, 511 West 18th St., 6:30

Onishi Project
Opening reception for group show “Summer Garden” featuring works by Osamu Kobayashi, Shinji Murakami, and Gail Stoicheff, with free special Mizu Shochu cocktails and live performance by Zander Padget at 7:00, 521 West 26th St.

Sragow Gallery
“The Art of Painting Portraits,” lecture by artist Alphonse van Woerkom, 115 West 30th St., 5:15

Yossi Milo Gallery
Book signing, Horizons by Sze Tsung Leong, 245 Tenth Ave., 6:00 – 8:00

CONTEMPORARY POETRY TOO

poetry too

Andrew Edlin Gallery
134 Tenth Avenue between 18th & 19th Sts.
Thursday, July 10, free, 6:00
212-206-9723
www.edlingallery.com

On May 10, Sam Gordon curated a marathon poetry reading as part of the NADA New York art fair, presented with BOMB magazine. Gordon, NADA, and BOMB have joined forces again with the follow-up, “Contemporary Poetry Too,” taking place July 10 at Andrew Edlin Gallery in Chelsea. Held in conjunction with the group exhibition “Purple States,” which explores the differences between insiders and outsiders and the merging of blue and red states, and “Café Dancer Pop-Up,” in which Jessie Gold and Elizabeth Hart have turned Edlin’s reception area into a “Gone Fishin’” party space, “Contemporary Poetry Too” will feature approximately eighteen poets reading their works in combination with performance and video art; the participants include Alina Gregorian, Angelo Nikolopoulos, Bianca Stone, Emily Skillings, Jameson Fitzpatrick, Juliana Huxtable, not_I (Ana Boziĉević & Sophia Le Fraga), and Sampson Starkweather. DJs S&M (Shannon Michael Cane and Matt Conners) will provide the music.

FIRST SATURDAYS: BROOKLYN SUMMER

David Hammons, “The Door (Admissions Office),” wood, acrylic sheet, and pigment construction, 1969 (California African American Museum, Los Angeles, Collection of Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum / © David Hammons)

David Hammons, “The Door (Admissions Office),” wood, acrylic sheet, and pigment construction, 1969 (California African American Museum, Los Angeles, Collection of Friends, the Foundation of the California African American Museum / © David Hammons)

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway at Washington St.
Saturday, July 5, free, 5:00 - 11:00 ($10 discounted admission to “Ai Weiwei: According to What?”)
212-864-5400
www.brooklynmuseum.org

The Brooklyn Museum is throwing a summer party for its July free First Saturdays program, centered by a twenty-fifth-anniversary screening of Spike Lee’s Bed-Stuy classic, Do the Right Thing. In addition, there will be music from Matuto, Blitz the Ambassador, DJ Uhuru, and Nina Sky, a female comedy showcase hosted by Erica Watson, a talk and fashion show led by Afros: A Celebration of Natural Hair author Michael July, a sidewalk chalk drawing project organized by the City Kids, a hula hoop demonstration with Hula Nation, an art workshop in which participants will learn figure drawing with a live model, and an interactive talk with “Brooklyn in 3000 Stills” creators Paul Trillo and Landon Van Soest. In addition, you can check out the current quartet of exhibitions, all of which deal with activism through art: “Ai Weiwei: According to What?,” “Swoon: Submerged Motherlands,” “Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Works, 1963–74,” and “Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties.”

Moneta Sleet Jr., “Selma Marchers on road to Montgomery,” gelatin silver photograph, 1965 (courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

Moneta Sleet Jr., “Selma Marchers on road to Montgomery,” gelatin silver photograph, 1965 (courtesy Brooklyn Museum)

The powerful, wide-ranging “Witness,” which has just been extended through July 13 (the other three exhibits continue into August or September), is a traveling show being held in conjunction with the fiftieth anniversary of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. More than one hundred paintings, sculptures, photographs, and installations are on view, divided into eight thematic categories: “Integrate Educate,” “American Nightmare,” “Presenting Evidence,” “Politicizing Pop,” “Black Is Beautiful,” “Sisterhood,” “Global Liberation,” and “Beloved Community.” In Bruce Davidson’s “USA. Montgomery, Alabama. 1961,” a black Freedom Rider sits by a window on a bus being escorted by the National Guard. David Hammons’s “The Door (Admissions Office)” is not exactly a welcoming sight. Norman Rockwell’s “New Kids in the Neighborhood (Negro in the Suburbs)” depicts three white children and two black children stopped on a sidewalk, curiously looking at each other. Melvin Edwards’s “Chaino” evokes slavery and lynchings. A trio of cartoonish KKK members drive into town in Philip Guston’s “City Limits.” There are also works by Romare Bearden, Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, Jack Whitten, Faith Ringgold, Ben Shahn, Betye Saar, Gordon Parks, Jim Dine, Yoko Ono, Barkley Hendricks, Robert Indiana, Richard Avedon, and others that examine the civil rights movement from multiple angles, displaying America’s continuing shame.

PUBLIC FORUM: SHAKESPEARE IN AMERICA

James Earl Jones, who played the title role in the 1964 Shakespeare in the Park production of OTHELLO, will be back at the Delacorte as special evening honoring the Bard’s influence on America

James Earl Jones, who played the title role in the 1964 Shakespeare in the Park production of OTHELLO, will be back at the Delacorte as special evening honoring the Bard’s influence on America

FREE PUBLIC FORUM
Delacorte Theatre
Monday, June 30, free, 8:00
Tickets available June 30 at 12 noon at the Delacorte and online lottery
www.publictheater.org

The latest free public forum hosted by the Public Theater takes a look at the lasting and still-evolving impact of the works of William Shakespeare on American culture. The special evening is inspired by the new book Shakespeare in America: An Anthology from the Revolution to Now (Library of America, April 2014, $29.95), in which President Bill Clinton writes in the foreword, “Shakespeare only had a fleeting acquaintance with America, judging from his work, which brushed up against the New World on only a couple of occasions. . . . Nevertheless, our engagement with him as been long and sustained: generation after generation of Americans has fallen under his spell.” Taking place Monday, June 30, at the Delacorte, where Shakespeare in the Park is currently presenting a rousing version of Much Ado About Nothing, the forum will include James Earl Jones reading a scene from Othello, fifty years after he starred in a production at the Delacorte; Alec Baldwin reading from Macbeth and other works; Kelli O’Hara and Renée Elise Goldsberry singing a number from Shakespeare in the Park’s Twelfth Night; Steven Pasquale handling the male part of the “Tonight” duet from West Side Story; along with presentations from Elizabeth Alexander, Billy Collins, Brian Dennehy, Colin Donnell, Michael Friedman, André Holland, Harold Holzer, Stephen Merritt, Bryce Pinkham, Caesar Samoyoa, Vijay Seshadri, Sarah Amengual, Colman Domingo, Cynthia Nixon, Annie-B Parson, and Michael Stuhlbarg. “In a nation wrestling with great issues,” Shakespeare in America editor and Public Theater Shakespeare scholar in residence James Shapiro writes in the book’s introduction, “Shakespeare’s works allowed Americans to express views that may otherwise have been hard to articulate – or admit to.”

GLOBALLY SPEAKING: DR. MAYA ANGELOU

Raw Space Culture Gallery
2031 Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. (Seventh Ave. between 121st & 122nd Sts.)
Tuesday, June 3, $10, 6:30
212-694-2887
www.facebook.com/RawSpaceNYC
www.mayaangelou.com

“The caged bird sings / with a fearful trill / of things unknown / but longed for still / and his tune is heard / on the distant hill / for the caged bird / sings of freedom.” So wrote Mississippi-born poet, teacher, activist, and artist Dr. Maya Angelou, who passed away on May 28 at the age of eighty-six. “She was a warrior for equality, tolerance, and peace,” her family said in a statement. Dr. Angelou, who wrote such books and poems as I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, I Shall Not Be Moved, and Still I Rise, had a mellifluous voice that was like music rising to the heavens, something the whole world got to hear when she recited “On the Pulse of Morning” at the January 1993 inauguration of President Bill Clinton. On June 3, Angelou’s life and career will be celebrated at “Globally Speaking,” a new open-mic poetry and conversation series at Raw Space on Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Blvd. The evening will include rare video clips of Angelou and an open discussion about I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. Dr. Angelou is also being honored with the exhibition “Phenomenal Woman: Maya Angelou, 1928-2014,” which continues through June 30 at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture on Malcolm X Blvd. and consists of handwritten and typed drafts of her works, letters, portraits, and more from the Maya Angelou Papers.

WORD FOR WORD: AUTHOR APPEARANCES

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK creator Piper Kerman will be at Bryant Park to discuss second season on (photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)

ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK’s Piper Kerman will be at Bryant Park on July 23 to discuss second season of hit Netflix show about her life in prison (photo by Rob Kim/Getty Images)

Bryant Park Reading Room
42nd St. between Fifth & Sixth Aves.
Wednesdays through August 20 at 12:30 & 7:00, free
(Other literary events held Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays)
www.bryantpark.org

Bryant Park’s popular Word for Word series continues through the summer in the outdoor Reading Room, a re-creation of the New York Public Library’s Open Air Library, which was started in August 1935 to give jobless New Yorkers somewhere to go and to experience lively culture during otherwise depressing days. There are book clubs, poetry readings, and storytelling for kids on Tuesday Thursdays, and Saturdays, but Wednesdays at 12:30 are reserved for author appearances, with readings, discussions, interviews, anecdotes, and Q&As, followed by signings. (In addition, beginning June 29, Wednesday evenings will feature authors promoting books on American historical political figures.) Below are only some of the highlights of this season’s schedule.

Wednesday, June 18
Jenny Mollen, I Like You Just the Way I Am: Stories About Me and Some Other People, with special guest Jason Biggs (American Pie, Orange Is the New Black), 12:30

Wednesday, July 16
Debut Novelists, with Mira Jacob (The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing), Courtney Maum (I Am Having So Much Fun Here Without You), Ted Thompson (The Land of Steady Habits), and Tiphanie Yanique (Land of Love and Drowning), hosted by Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop founder Julia Fierro, 12:30

Wednesday, July 23
Piper Kerman, Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison, 12:30

Wednesday, July 30
Kevin Smith & Jason Mewes, Jay & Silent Bob’s Blueprints for Destroying Everything, 12:30

Wednesday, August 20
“Taste Talks” with April Bloomfield of the Spotted Pig, A Girl and Her Pig: Recipes and Stories, moderated by Daniel Stedman, 12:30

MEET THE WRITERS OF BAY RIDGE

Champagne Diet founder Cara Alwill Leyba will be among the culinary writers celebrating Bay Ridge at special library program on May 31

Champagne Diet founder Cara Alwill Leyba will be among the culinary writers celebrating Bay Ridge at special library program on May 31

TWELVE LOCAL CHEFS, BAKERS, WRITERS, EDITORS, AND LITERARY AGENTS SHARE THEIR STORIES
Bay Ridge Library, second floor
7223 Ridge Blvd.
Saturday, May 31, free, 1:00
718-748-5709
www.bklynlibrary.org

Does literary Brooklyn have to mean hipsters in coffee shops in Williamsburg? Not at all. Brooklyn’s literary history is long and deep, from Walt Whitman’s lyrical Leaves of Grass to Hubert Selby Jr.’s brutal Last Exit to Brooklyn, but few may realize the rich culture of writers, editors, agents, and booksellers in Bay Ridge, home to numerous literary agents, bloggers, and editors as well as culinary innovators and cookbook creators. On Saturday afternoon, May 31, the Bay Ridge Library is hosting an event celebrating the neighborhood’s wealth of talent, with a pair of panel discussions moderated by literary agent Melissa Sarver White that look at multiple facets of literary and culinary Bay Ridge. “A Writing Life in Bay Ridge: Editors, Writers, Digital Authors & Bloggers Share Their Stories” brings together Cara Alwill Leyba (Sparkle: The Girl’s Guide to Living a Deliciously Dazzling, Wildly Effervescent, Kick-Ass Life; The Champagne Diet: Eat, Drink, and Celebrate Your Way to a Healthy Mind and Body!), Ken Wheaton (Bacon and Egg Man, The First Annual Grand Prairie Rabbit Festival), HarperCollins Children’s Books executive editor Kristen Pettit, culture editor Henry Stewart, and Sarah Zorn (Brooklyn Chef’s Table: Extraordinary Recipes from Coney Island to Brooklyn Heights). “Cooks and Books: Creativity and Entrepreneurship” features authors Allison Robicelli (Robicelli’s: A Love Story, with Cupcakes), Rawia Bishara (Olives, Lemons & Za’atar: The Best Middle Eastern Home Cooking), Allison Kave (First Prize Pies: Shoo-Fly, Candy Apple, and Other Deliciously Inventive Pies for Every Week of the Year [and More]), and Zorn, who will be joined by entrepreneurs Katarzyna Ploszaj of Petit Oven, Louis Coluccio Jr. of A.L.C. Italian Grocery, and a surprise guest from Leske’s Bakery. The talks will be followed by a book sale and signing sponsored by Bay Ridge’s BookMark Shoppe.