This Week in New York Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture in New York City Since 2001

SUPER SÁBADO: MAD ABOUT LIBROS

Angélica Negrón will be telling musical stories at free Super Sabado at El Museo del Barrio

Angélica Negrón will be telling musical stories at El Museo del Barrio for free Super Sabado celebration of books

FREE THIRD SATURDAYS
El Museo del Barrio
1230 Fifth Ave. at 104th St.
Saturday, April 19, free, 12 noon – 5:30 pm
212-831-7272
www.elmuseo.org

For the April edition of its free Super Sabado program, El Museo del Barrio celebrates the written word with “Mad About Libros.” From 12 noon to 3:00 on April 19, you can head over to the educational ArteXplorers Family Corner in the lobby or take part in a Manos a la Obra workshop where you can make your favorite book character. At noon and 2:00, in conjunction with Colorin Colorado, singer and actress Flor Bromley will be in the café, telling the stories of Librito and Juan Bobo and the Magic Book; composer and multi-instrumentalist Angélica Negrón will share the participatory musical tale of Amigos at 1:00 and 3:00. From noon to 4:00, there will be a book fair outside the museum. And at 4:30, Roger Cabán of Poetas con Café will host poetry readings by Myrna Nieves, Jesus Papoleto Meléndez, and others. In addition, you can check out the special exhibition “Museum Starter Kit: Open with Care” as well as “Presencia: Works from El Museo’s Permanent Collection,” featuring pieces by Luis Mendez, Shaun El C. Leonardo, Oscar Muñoz, Benvenuto Chavajay, Christian Cravo, Roberto Juárez, Fernando Salicrup, Rafael Tufiño, and more.

ART OF THE REAL 2014: SWEETGRASS

Sheep are on one of their last trips through the mountains in SWEETGRASS (Photo courtesy Cinema Guild)

Sheep are on one of their last trips through the mountains in SWEETGRASS (Photo courtesy Cinema Guild)

SWEETGRASS (Lucien Castaing-Taylor, 2009)
Film Society of Lincoln Center, Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center
Francesca Beale Theater, 144 West 65th St. at Amsterdam Ave.
Thursday, April 17, 6:30
Festival runs April 11-26
212-875-5601
www.filmlinc.com
www.sweetgrassthemovie.com

Husband-and-wife filmmakers Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Ilisa Barbash follow a flock of sheep herded by a family of Norwegian-American cowboys on their last sojourns through the public lands of Montana’s Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness in the gorgeously photographed, surprisingly intimate, and sometimes very funny documentary Sweetgrass. In 2001, Castaing-Taylor, director of the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard, and Barbash, a curator of Visual Anthropology at Harvard’s Peabody Museum, found out about the Allestad ranch, an old-fashioned, Old West group of sheepherders who still did everything by hand, including leading hundreds of sheep on a 150-mile journey into the mountains for summer pasture with only a few dogs and horses. Director Castaing-Taylor uses no voice-over narration or intertitles, instead inviting the viewer to join in the story as if in the middle of the action, offering no judgments or additional information. The film begins with shearing and feeding, then birthing and mothering, before heading out on the long, sometimes treacherous trail, especially at night, when bears and wolves sneak around, looking for food. Slowly the focus switches to the men themselves, primarily an old-time singing grizzled ranch hand and a cursing, complaining cowboy. Castaing-Taylor and Barbash spent three years with the sheepherders and in the surrounding areas, amassing more than two hundred hours of footage and making to date nine films out of their experiences, mostly shorter works to be displayed in gallery installations or for anthropological reasons; Sweetgrass is the only one that has been released theatrically, offering a fascinating look at something that is destined to soon be gone forever. Sweetgrass is screening April 17 at 6:30 in the Focus on the Sensory Ethnography Lab section of the Film Society of Lincoln Center series “Art of the Real,” held in conjunction with the Whitney Biennial, and will be followed by a Q&A with Barbash. The inaugural festival runs April 11-26, featuring more than three dozen works that push the boundaries of documentary film.

TRIBECA FILM FESTIVAL 2014: TOP TWENTY

Kevin Spacey will be at the Tribeca Film Festival discussing documentary about RICHARD III production he starred in

Kevin Spacey will be at the Tribeca Film Festival discussing documentary about RICHARD III production he starred in at BAM

Tribeca Film Festival
Multiple downtown locations
April 16-27, free - $33.50
646-502-5296
www.tribecafilm.com

Started by Robert De Niro, Craig Hatkoff, and Jane Rosenthal in 2002 as a way to help rebuild Lower Manhattan, the Tribeca Film Festival continues to mature as it reaches toward adolescence. The 2014 edition runs April 16-27 with world premieres, panel discussions, street fairs, workshops, and plenty of red carpet arrivals. Below is a guide to twenty highlights, beginning with ticket information. Hot items go fast, so, on your mark, get set...

Sunday, April 13
Individual tickets go on sale to downtown residents at ticket outlets only, proof of residence below Canal St. required, 11:00 am

Monday, April 14
Individual tickets go on sale to general public, all methods, 11:00 am

Monday, April 14
through
Thursday, April 17

Advance free tickets available for Film for All Friday (April 25), consisting of free screenings of thirty-five festival films at multiple locations (follow instructions here)

Thursday, April 17
Tribeca Drive-In: Mary Poppins (Robert Stevenson, 1964), Brookfield Place (World Financial Center), free, 8:00

Friday, April 18
CANCELLED: Tribeca Talks Directors Series: Lee Daniels with Robin Roberts, SVA Theater 1 Silas, 3:00

Tribeca Drive-In: Splash (Ron Howard, 1984), Brookfield Place (World Financial Center), free, 8:00

Saturday, April 19
Tribeca Talks After the Movie: Champs (Bert Marcus, 2014), screening followed by discussion with Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, and Lou DiBella, SVA Theater 1 Silas, $33.50, 3:00

Tribeca Drive-In: Next Goal Wins (Mike Brett & Steve Jamison, 2014), Brookfield Place (World Financial Center), free, 8:00

Saturday, April 19
through
Sunday, April 27

Meet the Filmmakers, workshops and discussions, Apple Store, SoHo and West 14th St., free, times and schedule to be announced

Sunday, April 20
Tribeca Talks Pen to Paper: Calling the Shots, with Marshall Curry, Ira Sachs, Orlando von Einseidel, and Sofia Norlin, moderated by Eric Kohn, Union Square B&N, free, 1:00

Monday, April 21
Tribeca Talks After the Movie: Now: In the Wings on a World Stage (Jeremy Whelehan, 2014), screening followed by discussion with Jeremy Whelehan, Kevin Spacey, and other members of the Richard III troupe, BMCC Tribeca PAC, $33.50, 6:00

Tuesday, April 22
Future of Film: Your Brain on Story — The Technologies of Immersion, with Jason Silva, and Future of Film: Your Brain on Story — Part Two: Psychos We Love, with Bryan Cranston, Terence Winter, and James Fallon, moderated by Cynthia McFadden, SVA Theater Two Beatrice, $33.50, 2:30

Thursday, April 24, 12 noon
through
Saturday, April 26, 6:00

Journey to the West at MoMA PS1: Journey to the West (Tsai Ming-Liang, 2014), MoMA PS1 geodesic VW Dome, free with museum admission

ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND will have special tenth anniversary screening at 2014 Tribeca Film Festival

ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND will have special tenth anniversary screening at 2014 Tribeca Film Festival

Friday, April 25
Possibilia: Endless Paths for Interactive Filmmaking: live interactive screening of Possibilia (Daniels) and screening of The Gleam (Daniels & Billy Chew), followed by discussion with members of the cast and crew, SVA Theater Beatrice, free with advance ticket, 2:30

Film for All Friday, free screenings of thirty-five festival films at multiple locations, advance tickets available April 14-17 (follow instructions here)

Saturday, April 26
Tribeca Family Festival Street Fair, with live performances, local food, games, and free screenings of The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming, 1939) at 11:00 am, shorts from the Tribeca Film Institute at 1:00, and Stories in Animation by StoryCorps at 3:00

Tribeca/ESPN Sports Day, with members of local professional sports teams, sports film screenings, athletic skill games, and more, North Moore St. between Greenwich & West Sts., free, 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tribeca Talks After the Movie: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004), tenth anniversary screening followed by discussion with Anthony Bregman, Daniella Schiller, and others, moderated by Ira Flatlow, SVA Theater 2 Beatrice, $33.50, 3:00

Tribeca Talks After the Movie: Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon (Mike Myers, 2013), screening followed by discussion with Michael Douglas and Shep Gordon, SVA Theater 1 Silas, $33.50, 5:30

Sunday, April 27
Tribeca Talks After the Movie: Compared to What: The Improbable Journey of Barney Frank (Sheila Canavan & Michael Chandler, 2014), screening followed by discussion with Barney Frank and Alec Baldwin, SVA Theater 1 Silas, $33.50, 2:30

MATA FESTIVAL 2014

Finnish new music ensemble Uusinta will be performing at the MATA Festival

Finnish new music ensemble Uusinta will be performing at the MATA Festival

The Kitchen and other locations
512 West 19th St. between Tenth & Eleventh Aves.
April 14-21, workshops and talks free with advance RSVP, concerts $20
www.matafestival.org
www.thekitchen.org

Tired of the same old, same old? Try something rather different at the annual spring MATA Festival. A nonprofit organization founded in 1996 by Philip Glass, Eleonor Sandresky, and Lisa Bielawa, MATA showcases the work of composers and musicians under the age of forty. This year’s fest runs April 14-21 at the Kitchen and other venues, with free workshops and panel discussions (with advance RSVP) and concerts a mere twenty bucks. The lineup features thirty-four composers from seventeen countries, beginning with a sweet sixteen gala on April 14 at Paula Cooper Gallery with live performances by ICE and Matt Evans, a sound installation by Christopher Marianetti, and more. On April 16, Yotam Haber, Melissa Smey, Chris McIntyre, Amelia Lukas, and Mark Peskanov will discuss “On the Art of Curation” at BMI at 7 World Trade Center at 2:00, and the Kitchen will host “Between Noise and Silence,” with Helsinki music ensemble Uusinta playing works by Aaron Helgeson, Alexander Khubeev, Joan Arnau Pàmies, Hikari Kiyama, Ilari Kaila, and Sampo Haapamäki. On April 17 at 3:30, the workshop “The Business of Being a Composer Part 1” will bring together Cia Toscanini, Scott Winship, Paola Prestini, Steven Swartz, Richard Carrick, and Sarah Kirkland Snider at ASCAP at 1 Lincoln Plaza; at the Kitchen at 8:00, “That Which Remains” consists of Rubens Askenar García Hernández’s El Puerperio, André Damião Bandeira’s em_bruto, Natacha Diels’s A Is for Alphabet, a new work by Alex Weiser, and a new MATA commission by Carolyn Chen, performed by such musicians as pianist Vicky Chow, percussionist Matt Evans, and violinist Marina Kiff.

The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE)

The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) will present U.S. premiere of Oscar Bianchi’s MATRA with Neue Vocalsolisten

On April 18 at 11:00 am, Uusinta is back for an Afternoon Reading Session at BMI; that night, Talea Ensemble and Ekmeles team up on pieces by Šimon Vosecek, Edward Hamel, Clara Ianotta, Todd Tarantino, Martin Iddon, and Josep Sanz for the program “Lives in Miniature.” On April 19 at 8:00 at the Kitchen, Germany’s Neue Vocalsolisten and ICE will present the U.S. premiere of Oscar Bianchi’s Matra, with tubax, contrabass recorder, and bass flute, followed by a Q&A. On Easter Sunday at 1:00 at the Kitchen, the a cappella Neue Vocalsolisten will highlight works by American composers Georges Aperghis, Silvia Rosani, Brahim Kerkour, Zaid Jabri, Francesco Filidei, Gabriel Dharmoo, Lars Petter Hagen, and Jennifer Walshe. The festival concludes on April 21 with the workshop “The Business of Being a Composer Part 2” at BMI at 11:00 am with Ralph N. Jackson, Deirdre Chadwick, Bill Holab, Katie Baron, and Michael Geller; a pair of snare drummers will play David Bird’s Fields on the High Line between Nineteenth & Twentieth Sts. at 1:30 (free, no RSVP necessary); and MIVOS Quartet and Mantra Percussion combine for “Of Circles and Motions of the Others” at the Kitchen at 8:00, performing Lisa Streich’s Playtime, Daniel Wohl’s Progression, Yotam Haber’s Torus, Ansgar Beste’s Pelerinage Fantastique, Paula Matthusen’s The Days Are Nouns, and Ke Xu’s Tai Chi.

ART OF THE REAL 2014: MANAKAMANA

MANAKAMANA

A mother and daughter eat ice cream in experimental documentary MANAKAMANA

MANAKAMANA (Stephanie Spray & Pacho Velez, 2013)
Film Society of Lincoln Center, Elinor Bunin Munroe Film Center
Francesca Beale Theater, 144 West 65th St. at Amsterdam Ave.
Saturday, April 12, 1:30
Festival runs April 11-26
212-875-5601
www.filmlinc.com
www.manakamanafilm.com

If you’re an adventurous filmgoer who likes to be challenged and surprised, the less you know about Pacho Velez and Stephanie Spray’s Manakamana, the better. But if you want to know more, here goes: Evoking such experimental films as Michael Snow’s Wavelength, Hollis Frampton’s Zorns Lemma, and Andy Warhol’s Screen Tests as well as the more narrative works of such unique auteurs as Jim Jarmusch and Abbas Kiarostami, Manakamana is a beautiful, meditative journey that is sure to try your patience at first. The two-hour film, which requires a substantial investment on the part of the audience, takes place in a five-foot-by-five-foot cable car in Nepal that shuttles men, women, and children to and from the historic Manakamana temple, on a pilgrimage to worship a wish-fulfilling Hindu goddess. With Velez operating the stationary Aaton 7 LTR camera — the same one used by Robert Gardner for his 1986 documentary Forest of Bliss — and Spray recording the sound, the film follows a series of individuals and small groups as they either go to or return from the temple, traveling high over the lush green landscape that used to have to be traversed on foot before the cable car was built. A man and his son barely acknowledge each other; a woman carries a basket of flowers on her lap; an elderly mother and her middle-age daughter try to eat melting ice-cream bars; a pair of musicians play their instruments to pass the time.

A heavy metal band takes a picture of themselves in meditative documentary

A heavy metal band takes a picture of themselves in meditative documentary

Each trip has its own narrative, which must be partly filled in by the viewer as he or she studies the people in the cable car and the surroundings, getting continually jolted as the car glides over the joins. The film is a fascinating look into human nature and technological advances in this era of surveillance as the subjects attempt to act as normal as possible even though a camera and a microphone are practically in their faces. Produced at the Sensory Ethnography Laboratory at Harvard, Manakamana consists of eleven uncut shots of ten-to-eleven minutes filmed in 16mm, using rolls whose length roughly equals that of each one-way trip, creating a kind of organic symbiosis between the making and projecting of the work while adding a time-sensitive expectation on the part of the viewer. A film well worth sticking around for till the very end — and one that grows less and less claustrophobic with each scene — Manakamana is screening April 12 at 1:30 in the Focus on the Sensory Ethnography Lab section of the Film Society of Lincoln Center series “Art of the Real,” held in conjunction with the Whitney Biennial, and will be followed by a Q&A with Spray and Velez. The inaugural festival runs April 11-26, featuring more than three dozen works that push the boundaries of documentary film.

THE AIPAD PHOTOGRAPHY SHOW 2014

Gyorgy Kepes, “Juliet with Peacock Feathers,” vintage gelatin silver print, 1939 (photo courtesy James Hyman Fine Art and Photographs)

Gyorgy Kepes, “Juliet with Peacock Feathers,” vintage gelatin silver print, 1939 (photo courtesy James Hyman Fine Art and Photographs)

Park Avenue Armory
643 Park Ave. between 66th & 67th Sts.
April 10-13, one-day pass $30, four-day pass $50
www.aipad.com

Formed in 1979, the Association of International Photography Art Dealers is, per its mission statement, “dedicated to creating and maintaining high standards in the business of exhibiting, buying, and selling photographs as art.” The next year, AIPAD organized its inaugural AIPAD Photography Show; the 2014 edition will be held April 10-13 at the Park Avenue Armory, preceded on April 9 by a gala benefit for Her Justice, a nonprofit consisting of lawyers and law firms that help facilitate life-changing results for women facing poverty and abuse. The fair features more than eighty galleries from around the world exhibiting solo, group, and thematic displays; you’ll find works by Stan Douglas, Philip diCorcia, Thomas Ruff, and James Welling at David Zwirner; Richard Renaldi at Bonni Benrubi; William Eggleston’s Memphis series at Catherine Edelman; Jim Campbell at Bryce Wolkowitz; Robert Heinecken at Robert Koch and Stephen Daiter (as well as a terrific show at MoMA), Jen Davis at Lee Marks; Robert Frank’s Peruvian images at Alan Klotz; Matthew Brandt’s “Dust” at Yossi Milo; Debbie Grossman’s “My Pie Town” at Julie Saul; Zhang Bing at 798; Richard Misrach at Etherton; Teikoh Shiotani at Taka Ishii; Charles Marville at Charles Isaacs, Hans B. Kraus Jr., and Robert Koch (in addition to a show at the Met); and Kikuji Kawada at Photo Gallery International and L. Parker Stephenson.

Elinor Carucci will be signing copies of her new book at AIPAD show

Elinor Carucci will be signing copies of her new book at AIPAD show

Among those signing books at various times are Adrienne Aurichio at Monroe (The Beatles: Six Days That Changed the World), Jerry Uelsmann at Scheinbaum & Russek (Uelsmann Untitled: A Retrospective), Andy Freeberg at Kopeikin (Art Fare), Elinor Carucci at Edwynn Houk (Mother), John Cyr at Verve (Developer Trays), and Renaldi at Bonni Benrubi (Touching Strangers). There will be also be four panel discussions on Saturday around the corner at Hunter College, beginning with “The Deciders: Curating Photography” at 10:00 and continuing with “LGBTQ/Photography” at noon, “Perspectives on Collecting” at 2:00, and a screening of Cheryl Dunn’s Everybody Street at 4:00, followed by a talk with Dunn, Jill Freedman, Max Kozloff, and Jeff Mermelstein.

TARTAN WEEK: THE KELPIES

(photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Andy Scott’s Kelpies will stand guard in Bryant Park through April 23 (photo by twi-ny/mdr)

Bryant Park, Fountain Terrace
Sixth Ave. at 41st St.
Sculptures on view through April 23
Festival runs through April 27 at multiple locations
www.thekelpies.co.uk
the kelpies slideshow

A pair of “proud equine guardians” have been posted at the Sixth Ave. and Forty-First St. entrance to Bryant Park, one at rest, head bowed, the other rearing up, neighing toward the sky. The fifteen-foot-high models, constructed of laser-cut steel plates, are the work of Scottish sculptor Andy Scott, smaller versions of the one-hundred-feet-high Kelpies — mythological waterborne equine creatures — he created for the Helix Parkland on the Forth & Clyde Canal near Falkirk, the artist’s father’s hometown, in central Scotland. The Kelpies, which will remain on view in Bryant Park through April 23, are part of the annual Scotland Week (Tartan Week) festivities, a celebration of Scottish culture taking place all over the city. On April 6, there will be a special Tartan Day Observance in Bryant Park at 12:30 with the New York Metro Pipe Band, the Highland Divas, and others, followed by a talk with Scott about the Kelpies at 3:00. That night, the Caledonian Collective will be hosting a concert at Webster Hall with the LaFontaines, Nina Nesbitt, Lau, and Hector Bizerk. Iona in Brooklyn will be presenting a Scottish fiddle workshop on April 7 with Katie McNally, followed by a Live Trad Session with McNally and Neil Pearlman; on April 8, Scottish Octopus with piper Andrew Forbes will be there, and on April 9 Troy MacGillivray will lead a Cape Breton fiddle workshop and a live session with Scottish Octopus. Also on April 9, Whisky Live takes place at Pier Sixty in Chelsea, with tastings, exhibitors, master classes, live music, and more. On April 10, Celtica will play Drom, while the Cape Breton Scots at Jalopy is highlighted by the work of musician and photographer Matt Diaz. Pop International Galleries is showing “As Others See Us” through April 10, and the 92nd St. Y is presenting “Scots Jews: Identity, Belonging, and the Future” through April 27, consisting of photos taken by Judah Passow. And you can see the double bill of Douglas Maxwell’s A Respectable Widow Takes to Vulgarity and Sabrina Mahfouz’s Clean performed by Edinburgh’s Traverse Theatre Company through April 27 at 59E59.