This Week in New York Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture in New York City Since 2001

BRYANT PARK PICNICS: EMERGING MUSIC FESTIVAL

Bryant Park Emerging Music Festival returns for fourth year Friday and Saturday

Bryant Park Emerging Music Festival returns for fourth year Friday and Saturday (photo by Ryan Muir)

Bryant Park
Friday, August 17, and Saturday, August 18, free, 5:00
bryantpark.org

The fourth annual Emerging Music Festival in Bryant Park takes place Friday and Saturday afternoon, featuring sets by ten up-and-coming bands from across the musical spectrum. The free festivities begin Friday at 5:00 with EZTV, followed by Underground System at 6:00, Palmas at 7:00, Ohmme at 8:00, and Evolfo at 9:00. Saturday kicks off at 5:00 with Madison McFerrin and continues at 6:00 with Plastic Picnic, 7:00 with Jerron ‘Blind Boy’ Paxton & Terry Waldo Rum House Jass Band, 8:00 with Native Sun, and 9:00 with Katie Von Schleicher. There will also be lawn games and juggling in between sets and food and drink available for purchase. The concerts are part of the Bryant Park Picnics program, which concludes August 22 with Accordions Around the World.

HARLEM WEEK 2018: SUMMER IN THE CITY / HARLEM DAY

Ashleigh Smith will perform at this years annual Harlem Day festivities

Ashleigh Smith will perform at this year’s annual “Harlem Day” festivities

West 135th St. between Malcolm X Blvd. & Frederick Douglass Blvd.
Saturday, August 18, and Sunday, August 19, free, 12 noon – 10:00 pm
Festival continues through August 25
harlemweek.com

The theme of the 2018 Harlem Week festival is “Women Transforming Our World: Past, Present & Future,” along with the subtheme “The Community within the Community,” saluting LGBTQ rights. The festivities continue August 18 with “Summer in the City” and August 19 with “Harlem Day,” two afternoons of a wide range of free special events along West 135th St. Saturday’s programs include Harlem Senior Citizens Synchronized Swimming, the NYC Children’s Festival in Howard Bennett Playground (with a parade, exhibits, games, arts & crafts, live music and dance, health testing, and sports clinics), the Harlem Week Higher Education Fair (with more than fifty colleges and universities), “Dancing in the Streets” with live performances and WBLS DJs, the International Vendors Village, the Fabulous Fashion Flava Show, the “Uptown Saturday Concert” (with Sarah Vaughan National Competition winner Ashleigh Smith, Bishop Marvin Sapp, Raheem Devaughn, and the Jeff Foxx Band), and the Imagenation Outdoor Film Festival in St. Nicholas Park. Sunday’s “Harlem Day” celebration features live performances on three stages, the International Vendors Village, the Upper Manhattan Auto Show, Our Health Village, the Upper Manhattan Small Business Expo & Fair, USTA Children’s Tennis Clinics, and the second day of the NYC Children’s Festival (with a Back to School theme).

FREE SUMMER EVENTS: AUGUST 12-19

Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival returns to Queens for its twenty-eighth season

Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival returns to Queens for its twenty-eighth season

The free summer arts & culture season is under way, with dance, theater, music, art, film, and other special outdoor programs all across the city. Every week we will be recommending a handful of events. Keep watching twi-ny for more detailed highlights as well.

Sunday, August 12
Twenty-Eighth Annual Hong Kong Dragon Boat Festival, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Monday, August 13
Movie Nights: Thelma & Louise (Ridley Scott, 1991), Bryant Park, sundown

Tuesday, August 14
Red Hook Flicks on the Pier: Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme, 1991), Valentino Pier, sundown

Wednesday, August 15
SummerScreen: Die Hard (John McTiernan, 1988), McCarren Park, sundown

Dr. Strangelove is a grim, if hysterically funny, reminder of the threat of nuclear war

Dr. Strangelove is a grim, if hysterically funny, reminder of the threat of nuclear war

Thursday, August 16
Central Park Conservancy Film Festival: Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (Stanley Kubrick, 1964), Central Park, landscape between Sheep Meadow & 72nd St. Cross Drive, dusk

Friday, August 17
Hudson RiverFlicks — Family Fridays: The Karate Kid (John G. Avildsen, 1984), Pier 46, Hudson River Park, Greenwich Village, 8:30

Saturday, August 18
Rite of Summer: Collaborative Arts Ensemble, Colonels Row, Governors Island, 1:00 & 3:00

Sunday, August 19
SummerStage: Mura Masa and Jessy Lanza, Rumsey Playfield, Central Park, 7:00

FREE SUMMER EVENTS: AUGUST 5-12

Black Panther

Black Panther is screening for free in Cunningham Park on August 6

The free summer arts & culture season is under way, with dance, theater, music, art, film, and other special outdoor programs all across the city. Every week we will be recommending a handful of events. Keep watching twi-ny for more detailed highlights as well.

Sunday, August 5
Movies Under the Stars: Escape to Witch Mountain (John Hough, 1975), Beach 94th St. off Shorefront Parkway in Rockaway Beach, 8:00

Monday, August 6
Movies Under the Stars: Black Panther (Ryan Coogler, 2018), Cunningham Park, Queens, 8:00

Tuesday, August 7
signs & symbols: artists & allies, group exhibition opening featuring work and discourse, with live performances and discussions continuing every Thursday night through September 7, signs & symbols, 102 Forsyth St., 6:00

Wednesday, August 8
Hip to Hip Free Shakespeare in the Park: All’s Well That Ends Well, directed by Owen Thompson, Flushing Meadows Corona Park at the Unisphere, continues in repertory with King Lear at various parks through August 25, Kids & the Classics workshop at 7:00, show at 7:30

Wild Style will celebrate its thirty-fifth anniversary with special guests on August 9

Wild Style will celebrate its thirty-fifth anniversary with special guests on August 9 in East River Park

Thursday, August 9
SummerStage: Wild Style 35th Anniversary Reunion at the Amphitheater with special guest DJ Funk Flex, with Almighty Kay Gee, Busy Bee, Charlie Ahearn, DJ Grand Wizzard Theodore, DJ Tony Crush, Eclipse, EZ AD, Grand Master Caz, Patti Astor, and Rodney C and preshow hip-hop dance workshop with Fabel, East River Park Amphitheater in John V. Lindsay East River Park, 6:00

Friday, August 10
Lincoln Center Out of Doors: West Side Story Reimagined, with Bobby Sanabria Multiverse Big Band and poetry by La Bruja and Rich Villar, Damrosch Park Bandshell, 7:30

Saturday, August 11, 18, 25
Norte Maar’s Dance at Socrates, with Kristina Hay and Hilary Brown | HB² PROJECTS and Gleich Dances with Sarah Louise Kristiansen on August 11, Movement Migration | Blakeley White-McGuire and Project 44 | Gierre Godley with Janice Rosario & Company on August 18, and Kyle Marshall Choreography and Kathryn Alter and Dancers with Thomas/Ortiz Dance and konverjdans on August 25, Socrates Sculpture Park, 4:00

Sunday, August 12
Blues Brunch with Bill Sims Jr., Bryant Park Southwest Porch, 12 noon

SUMMER STREETS 2018

summer streets

Park Ave. & 72nd St. to Foley Square
Saturday, August 4, 11, 18, free, 7:00 am – 1:00 pm
www.nyc.gov

Now in its ninth year, Summer Streets takes place the first three Saturday mornings in August, as Park Ave. will be closed to vehicular traffic from 72nd St. to Foley Square and the Brooklyn Bridge from 7:00 am to 1:00 pm, encouraging people to walk, run, jog, blade, skate, slide, and bike down the famous thoroughfare, getting exercise and enjoying the great outdoors without car exhaust, speeding taxis, and slow-moving buses. There are five rest stops along the route (Uptown at 52nd St., Midtown at 25th, Astor Pl. at Lafayette St., SoHo at Spring & Lafayette, and Foley Square at Duane & Centre), where people can relax and enjoy food and drink, live performances, fitness classes, site-specific art installations, dog walks, bicycle workshops, and other activities, all of which are free. Below are some of the highlights.

Foley Square Rest Stop
Zipline, Mobile Tea Garden, juggling and hula lessons, streets games, DOT Hand-Cycle Activation, adaptive basketball, group runs, bike programs, DEP Water on the Go, and pop-up performances by the Bryant Park Jugglers, the Hoop Movement, HONK NYC, Fogo Azul, and Batingua

SoHo Rest Stop
Paws and Play Dog Park, dog park and agility course, fitness stage, pop-up yoga, Zumba with Wilson Gutierrez (August 4), Sherrod Wiliamson (August 11) and Chris. Y (August 18), and WRKNYC FitFam BootCamp with Coach Will (Will Jackson), Coach Cook (Sarah Diiorio), and Coach Bakes (Amanda Baker), and Cardio Kick with Delida Torres on August 11, Hip Hop with Corinne Tate on August 11, and Dance HIIT with Bryan Davis on August 18

Astor Place Rest Stop
Clif Kids Park custom pump track, BBF Bouldering Wall & Obstacle Course, I LOVE NY Mobile Visitor’s Center, Gazillion Bubble Show’s Bubble Garden, DEP Water on the Go

Midtown Rest Stop
Food & Beverage Sampling Zone (with free samples from Obrigado, Hippeas, Lifeway, Nuun, Kevita, Krave Jerky, SkinnyPop, Simply Beverages, and Purity Organics), bike programming, Go! Sports Inline Skate Rentals and Clinics, the Five Borough Bicycle Club Bike Repair, DEP Water on the Go, NYC Department of Sanitation (with reusable bag giveaway), Health and Fitness Zone, cooking demonstrations, interactive “Smell Synth” exhibit with Museum of Food and Drink, NYCDOT Mobility Management Program, and live performances by Eliano Braz, Ensemble Connect: Lizzie Burns and Julia Yang, Hye-Jeung Kang, Ashley Wasser, YAZBAND, the Good Morning Nags, Inti and the Moon, and the Blue Dahlia on August 4, Gabriel Aldort, Jade Choi, TM Street Band, Sulene, Moondrunk, Baby Soda Jazz Band, Backtrack Vocals, and Drumadics Beat-N-Brass Band on August 11, and marie-claire and the boys, Ensemble Connect: Rosie Gallagher and Andre Gonzalez, Joanna Teters, Skye Steele, JHEVERE, Karikatura Street Band, Coexist Music Group, and John James Band on August 18

Uptown Rest Stop
Kid Fitness Zone, DOT Safety Zone, bike programming, DEP Water on the Go, arts & cultural workshops (Urban Studio Unbound, HYPOTHEkids, Manhattan Borough Historian, Noguchi Museum, Society of Illustrators, Museum of Chinese in America, Art Students League, Publicolor, New York Botanical Garden, CultureNow, DCLA Materials for the Arts, El Museo del Barrio, the Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Brooklyn Children’s Museum, and Museum of Arts & Design), Taoist Tai Chi Society, Municipal Art Society historical walking tours (Jean Arrington: “City Beautiful and Benevolent,” August 4; Deborah Zelcer, Decked Out on Park Avenue: “Art Déco Buildings and New York Glamour,” August 11; Alan M. Engler, MD, Mansions, Money & Scandal: “Gilded Age Splendor on the Upper East Side,” August 18), and performances by Gibney Dance, Dana & the Petite Punks, Ben Rosenblum Trio, Dream Street Theatre Company, Music with a Message, Izaak Mills’ Contemporary Adults, and Department of Youth and Community Development on August 4, Rite of Spring Duo, Bumblebee Jamboree, NYC Kids Project, the Poor Cousins, Niall O’Leary School of Irish Dance, Dayboat Brass Quartet, and Ori Manea Tahitian Dance School on August 11, and New York Violinist, Triad Brass, Robert Anderson Band, the Afro-Latineers, Stiletta, Dance Entropy, and Dancing Classrooms on August 18

BROOKLYN MUSEUM FIRST SATURDAY: caribBEING in Brooklyn

Brooklyn’s Alex Mali will perform as part of Brooklyn Museum’s August First Saturday free programming

Brooklyn’s Alex Mali will perform as part of Brooklyn Museum’s August First Saturday free programming

Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway at Washington St.
Saturday, August 4, free, 5:00 - 11:00
212-864-5400
www.brooklynmuseum.org

The Brooklyn Museum starts preparing for the annual West Indian Day Parade with the August edition of its free First Saturday program. There will be live performances by Brooklyn-born singer-songwriter Alex Mali, the Pan Evolution Steel Orchestra, and the Brooklyn Dance Festival, with Dance Caribbean Collective, the Sabrosura Effect, Project of ContempoCaribe, KaNu Dance Theater, and Bloodline Dance Theatre, followed by a Q&A; a Fiyah Fit movement workshop with choreographer Jessica Phoenix; a caribBEING House mobile art center; a hands-on workshop in which participants can create noisemakers for the West Indian Day Parade, inspired by instruments in “Life, Death, and Transformation in the Americas”; Drink and Draw sketching of live models from mas camps, with sounds by Rodney Hazard; pop-up gallery talks by teen apprentices on Caribbean art and stylistic influences in the museum collection; pop-up poetry with Rico Frederick, Erica Mapp, and Camille Rankine of Cave Canem; and the community talk “Organizing Caribbean Communities in Brooklyn” with Ernest Skinner, Dr. Waldaba Stewart of the Medgar Evers Caribbean Research Center, Ninaj Raoul of Haitian Women for Haitian Refugees, and Albert Saint Jean of the Black Alliance for Just Immigration. In addition, the galleries will be open late so you can check out “William Trost Richards: Experiments in Watercolor,” “Infinite Blue,” “Cecilia Vicuña: Disappeared Quipu,” “A Woman’s Afterlife: Gender Transformation in Ancient Egypt,” and more.

TWI-NY TALK: STEVE STERNER / STEVE STERNER SELECTS…

steve sterner selects

Film Forum
209 West Houston St.
August 1 - November 4
212-727-8110
filmforum.org

For thirty-five years, Bronx-raised actor, singer, conductor, composer, gambler, puzzlemeister, and arranger Steve Sterner has been playing piano accompaniment to silent films at such venues as the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the old Thalia, and Film Forum, where he’s been the resident silent film composer/accompanist since 1987. Film Forum is honoring the self-described “bad improviser” with a series of his own, “Steve Sterner Selects . . . ,” running through November 4 and beginning August 1, when the institution reopens after a major renovation and the addition of a fourth theater. The festival consists of a dozen silent works chosen by the longtime Upper West Sider, who’s lived in the same rent-stabilized apartment on West Seventy-First Street since 1979. Among the films chosen by the sixty-seven-year-old Sterner, who will, of course, play piano at every screening — preceded by his traditional cough drop — are King Vidor’s Show People, which will be introduced by FF programmer extraordinaire Bruce Goldstein; Clarence Brown’s Flesh and the Devil, the first silent movie Sterner played music for; William Wellman’s Wings, winner of the first Best Picture Oscar; Edward Sedgwick’s The Cameraman, in which Buster Keaton is let loose on an unsuspecting New York City; and Sam Taylor’s lesser-known Exit Smiling. Sterner, who was also the subject of Paola Ochoa’s short 2014 documentary, The Accompanist, recently answered questions via email for twi-ny about his life and career.

twi-ny: When did you first realize you wanted to play piano accompaniment to silent films? Was there a eureka moment?

steve sterner: I never aspired to accompany silent films. I was thrown into it by Wayne Daigrepont, a cartoon collector on the staff at the Thalia theater.

twi-ny: What do you see as the primary responsibility of playing piano accompaniment?

ss: Be faithful to the film and enhance it as best you can.

Piano accompanist Steve Sterner will participate in a Q&A with Film Forum repertory programmer Bruce Goldstein following October 16 screening of A Hero for a Night

Piano accompanist Steve Sterner will participate in a Q&A with Film Forum repertory programmer Bruce Goldstein following October 16 screening of A Hero for a Night

twi-ny: In the past, you have said that your playing should not be the focus, that the audience shouldn’t even notice you and instead should get lost in the film while you play. What does it feel like to now be the center of attention, putting together a series at Film Forum with your name in the title?

ss: The film is the star — I’m a supporting player. However, it’s always nice to be recognized when I’m not playing the piano.

twi-ny: On October 16, you will be sitting down with FF programming genius Bruce Goldstein for a discussion and Q&A in conjunction with a screening of William James Craft’s A Hero for a Night. What is it like working with Bruce?

ss: Working with Bruce has always been a joy. I think he’s one of the last great impresarios.

twi-ny: You’ve been doing this professionally since the early 1980s. Over those decades, has the audience changed at all? For example, are they any more or less attentive in this social-media-saturated age? And is the audience itself older, or are the younger generations showing up as well?

ss: I think the audience has gotten younger over the years, but other than that I haven’t paid much attention to the makeup of the audience.

twi-ny: For many years, you and Donald Sosin have been the go-to guys when it comes to this art form. Are you friends? Is there a competition between you for specific films or gigs?

ss: I wish I could play piano as well as Donald Sosin. I met him in the ’90s and have heard him play many times since. If there’s competition between us I’m unaware of it, but I’d never feel slighted to lose a job to him. He’s one of the best.

twi-ny: In addition to Film Forum, you’ve played numerous other New York City venues. Do you have a favorite (other than FF)?

ss: I enjoyed playing at the Thalia in the ’80s.

Ted Wildes Harold Lloyd silent comedy Kid Brother concludes Steve Sterner series November 4-5

Ted Wilde’s Harold Lloyd silent comedy Kid Brother concludes Steve Sterner series on November 3-4

twi-ny: Is there a specific silent film that you would love to play piano with but for some reason, either rights or the quality or existence of an acceptable print, you’ve been unable to?

ss: Any lost film that’s been unearthed.

twi-ny: Do you have a particular favorite silent film?

ss: The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg.

twi-ny: Favorite silent film director?

ss: Lubitsch, Hitchcock, Seastrom, Murnau, and others.

twi-ny: Favorite silent film composer?

ss: Charles Hoffman and William Perry.

twi-ny: Favorite sound film composer?

ss: Max Steiner.

twi-ny: Favorite silent film star?

ss: Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, Lon Chaney, Clara Bow, and Douglas Fairbanks.

twi-ny: When you're not accompanying silent films, what do you like to do for fun in New York City?

ss: I watch baseball and ’50s television shows on YouTube.