This Week in New York Insider's Guide to Arts & Culture in New York City Since 2001

1May/18

FRIEZE NEW YORK 2018

Lara Schnitger, Suffragette City (Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA), 2016 Courtesy the artist, Anton Kern Gallery, New York. Photo: Joshua White Photography

Lara Schnitger, “Suffragette City” (Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, USA), 2016 (courtesy the artist, Anton Kern Gallery, New York; photo by Joshua White Photography)

FRIEZE ART FAIR
Randall’s Island Park
May 2-3 (preview), 4-6 (public), $74.50 per day
frieze.com

It’s May, and the big white tents are opening on Randall’s Island, where the seventh annual Frieze New York is sheltering art offered by nearly two hundred galleries from more than two dozen countries. More integrated into New York City’s nonstop art scene than ever, Frieze not only features associated Frieze Week projects and events around the city but also invites a more diverse group of fairgoers, artists, and activists with an updated layout and new curators. Frieze is associated with performances, installations, and events throughout the week, including Eduardo Chillada’s first exhibition at Hauser & Wirth, Huma Bhabha’s “With a Trace” at Salon 94, and Adam Pendleton’s provocative six-month installation, “Black Dada Flag (Black Lives Matter),” at Scylla Point on Randall’s Island, an area once called “Negro Point.” (Pendleton’s “What a day was this” is also on view at Lever House.) At the fair, “bespoke” private art tours beckon collectors looking for exactly the right something, while an Art Passport for teens and special $12 admission pricing on Friday for the eighteen-to-twenty-five-year-old crowd aims to bring in cost-conscious art fans and young artists; Frieze ticket holders also receive $5 off the price of admission or $25 off a membership at MoMA all weekend long. Meanwhile, MoMA PS1 is hosting the “Night at the Museum: Springtober Fest” party on May 5.

The Live program, offered for the first time in New York, is curated by Adrienne Edwards, the newly appointed Whitney curator of performance, and showcases seven pieces in ASSEMBLY, focusing on collective protest with processions, ritualistic and conceptual performance, sound installations, banners and flags, and more. The Frame section features nineteen solo shows by emerging galleries, while the thirty-six galleries in Spotlight concentrate on important twentieth-century work. Be on the lookout for work by Kapwani Kiwanga, the winner of this year’s Frieze Artist Award. Frieze Talks keeps things lively with a stellar lineup of novelists, writers, historians, and artists in discussion, a few of which are spotlighted below, ensuring that Frieze New York’s traveling spectacle under the tents never has a dull moment, even when fairgoers are perhaps just resting their feet. Frieze also tends to have the best dining choices of any of the art fairs, so come hungry.

Adam Pendleton, Black Dada Flag (Black Lives Matter), 2015–2018. Digital print on polyester, dimensions variable. Courtesy: the artist and PACE

Adam Pendleton, “Black Dada Flag (Black Lives Matter),” digital print on polyester, 2015–18 (photo courtesy of the artist and Pace)

Wednesday, May 2
Lara Schnitger, Suffragette City, procession through the fair, 5:00

Thursday, May 3
Raúl de Nieves and Erik Zajaceskowski, THANK YOU/THANK YOU, procession through the fair, 3:00

Lara Schnitger, Suffragette City, procession through the fair, 5:00

Jerry Saltz presented by New York magazine, 6:00

Friday, May 4
Abraham Cruzvillegas and Carlos Amorales in conversation with Yuri Herrera, 12 noon

Ottessa Moshfegh in conversation with Patty Cottrell, 3:00

Kaitlyn Greenidge in conversation with Kerri Greenidge, 3:00

Saturday, May 5
Fred Moten in conversation with Sondra Perry, 12 noon

Lara Schnitger, Suffragette City, procession through the fair, 3:00

Rujeko Hockley in conversation with Kaitlyn Greenidge and Kerri Greenidge, 3:00

Sunday, May 6
Elif Batuman in conversation with Negar Azimi, 12 noon

Dave McKenzie, Furtive Gestures, 1:00

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